[Ebook] ➠ The Bridge By Iain Banks – Thomashillier.co.uk

The Bridge Read The Bridge Iain Banks Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk In The Bridge, Master Storyteller And Weaver Of Worlds, Iain Banks Creates A Mysterious Structure That Leads From Nowhere To Nowhere Everyone Lives On The Bridge, Including A Man Named Orr, Devoid Of Personality Or Memory, And Haunted By Dreams Of War Banks Engaging Blend Of The Cutting Edge Hypothetical And Blistering Reality Collide InThe BridgeThe Bridge Is Like None Other A Multi Layered Society Of Incredible Cities, Terrible War Zones, Humor, Horror And Lust Now That John Orr Victim Of A Terrible Car Accident Has Reached It, The Question Remains Of What Lies On The Other Side Banks Is A Phenomenon Wildly Successful, Fearlessly Creative With Gnarly Energy And Elegance William Gibson, Author Of Neuromancer Banks Never Does The Same Thing Twice But He Always Does It Sublimely Los Angeles Times


10 thoughts on “The Bridge

  1. says:

    Iain Banks was a genius and The Bridge is one of his greatest works Few would disagree with the first statement, but some might disagree with the last.Why Because this novel utilizes a pretty cheesy central plot device that the events occurring are the dreams of a man in a coma If this puts you off I understand usually any novel using the It was all a dream premise sounds as appealing to me as Days of our Lives in book form but trust me this novel is worth your time If you can look past this cliched premise you will find yourself immersed in one of the best books I ve read in the last decade.If you ve read any Banks you ll know that he was as comfortable with literary fiction as he was with Science Fiction, writing many books in both genres during his career The Bridge falls into the litfic section of his output, but contains enough weird and speculative elements to appeal to those like me whose tastes tend towards genre.The story is split three ways.The first character, Alex, wakes on a bridge However, this is no ordinary bridge This bridge is a world, a vast, many levelled structure that spans a seemingly endless sea, stretching off into infinity in either direction, an entire civilization existing within its steel stanchions and concrete buttresses.Alex lives in this strange world, unsure how he came to be there exploring his new home and meeting with a psychiatrist to discuss his disturbing dreams Dreams within a dream...


  2. says:

    Con Banks se cumple una m xima nunca escribe dos veces la misma historia Y esto no es nada sencillo, ya que en un momento u otro todos los escritores caen en el autoplagio.La historia es apasionante John Orr, nuestro protagonista, vive en una ciudad que no es tal Se trata de un puente de unas dimensiones enormes en el que hay trenes, tranv as, ciudades, aviones que sobrevuelan el puente sin raz n aparente, dirigibles y todo dentro del puente John sufre amnesia y visita peri dicamente la consulta de un doctor al que le cuenta sus sue os como terapia, sue os que son importantes para la historia ya que son otro protagonista m s Pero John est intrigado por este puente, pregunta y pregunta pero nadie sabe o quiere responderle Intenta buscar la Biblioteca para obtener respuestas, pero parece que nadie sabe donde se encuentra Parece que John se encuentra perdido, hasta que conoce a una joven Y es que esta es una historia ...


  3. says:

    This review contains a mild spoiler I don t know if you can call it a spoiler, because the book description as well as the Publishers Weekly review both give it away I think that s a crying shame, although it s not really a spoiler that would take a lot of brain cells to figure out on your own Anyway, I wouldn t mention it in my review if it weren t a key reason why I disliked the novel Are you ready Here it is It s all a dream.Sigh This book was written 25 years ago, but even then the it was all a dream scenario wasn t really all that fresh or interesting, and it takes a heckuva a lot of talent to pull it off without getting readers to feel like they ve wasted their time After all, absolutely anything can happen in dreams, and so it s never really a surprise when anything does Say goodbye to plot, conflict, tension, drama, or any of the other structural bits and pieces that authors use to guide their storytelling The most you can do with it was all a dream is connect it in some way to reality and hope that the bridge is meaningful or profound in some way.The metaphor of the bridge is a pretty hefty one here Suffering from amnesia, our narrator is fished from the waters around a bridge This is no ordinary bridge It s so large that it seems to have no beginning or ending, and an entire civi...


  4. says:

    What the hell this is so boring and aimless, and just not very well crafted either I have to return to Murakami s rule from 1Q84 if the reader hasn t seen something before, you should take extra time to describe it.And I knew it I knew if I even caught a sniff of criticism of this book they would call it Kafka esque , everyone s favourite shorthand for weird and depressing People praise Murakami for his true understanding of Kafka, and I have to praise him too because I don t get Kafka, but I have a strong inkling for what someone is going to call Kafka esque, which often only tells me that the critic is reminded of Kafka, and not necessarily that the writing has any qualities of Kafka Incidentally, this also feels like the depths of Banks understanding of Kafka Kafka.Okay, so this is a book about psychology and an in depth exploration of our relationships, but first and foremost, it may come as a surprise that it s actually about a fucking bridge And if you go I got in the lift, I went to the building where is the lift The building, in relation to the bridge Alongside it Does it occlude the passage along the bridge Then your character goes beneath the bridg...


  5. says:

    Banks apparently thinks this is his best novel, and I agree A very fine interleaving of dream and reality, without making the connections overly clear Kafka meets the Wizard of Oz.


  6. says:

    I love bridges, I spent much of my childhood designing them and building models I love pictures and photographs of, and books about bridges, and I love the engineering aspects I sit on bridges, under bridges, and looking at bridges, and feel complete I love the Forth Bridge in Scotland, from when I first saw it on The 39 Steps Hitchcock to when my Dad took me up there when I was 10 And I like Iain Banks who was brought up on the Fife side of the Forth Bridge So when I read this knockout fantasy...


  7. says:

    Considering my affection for Banks, it s remarkable how this book was about as enjoyable as a two by four across the forehead I found it tedious and depressing.


  8. says:

    When I first read The Bridge in my late teens, it had a huge impact on me I d never really read anything quite like it before the blending of social realism and the science fiction fantasy world of The Bridge itself Returning to it nearly twenty years later, I found it an enjoyable enough read, but couldn t help noticing its flaws It isn t either quite as original or as clever as I had remembered it.At the risk of a very minor spoiler I think it s reasonably apparent to anyone who reads the first page properly , the book tells two stories One, the story of John Orr, a man who washes up with no idea who he is or how he got there, at the foot of a quite surreal civilisation living on a phantasmagorically huge bridge The other, the story of an un named man though I have read that you can work out that he s called Alex Lennox from the diagrams of the Bridge in the book and his surname, at least, is corroborated by a reference to the lead singer of the Eurythmics from a working class Glasgwegian background who arrives at Edinburgh University in the late 1960s, falls in love with the upper class Andrea Cramond, has a rather unconventional menage a trois relationship with her over the following eighteen years, while building up a successful engineering firm, all the while feeling an underlying discomfort that he is somehow betraying his working class roo...


  9. says:

    Just one thing I nod at the bodies littering the ground like fallen leaves What happened here What happened to all these people He shrugs They didn t listen to their dreams, he says, then turns back to his task pp.362 363Like skywriting in Braille the late Iain Banks early novel The Bridge is hard to get a grip on The comparisons that spring to my mind are mostly cinematic think David Lynch s Mulholland Drive, or perhaps Adrian Lyne s Jacob s Ladder.Feverish and multilayered, The Bridge is a challenging work, not easy to appreciate, or to synopsize A man lies in a coma after a car crash in Scotland an amnesiac tries to fit into the linear society he finds living on an apparently endless bridge a barbarian warrior battles sorcery while ridden by a magical familiar This is Banks without the M., the initialless persona he used for his mimetic fiction, but the veil between fantasy and realism here is very thin Most of The Bridge appears to be fabulation, in fact the great Bridge itself is a setting worthy of China Mi ville, and there are swathes of a swashbuckling sword a...


  10. says:

    Hypnagogic, mesmerising, hallucinatory the melding of the real with the vanished, the imaginary, the may never have been A bridge becomes the whole architectonic world of a mind, and vice versa As experiment in stretching a formal conceit to an aesthetic project, Bank s saran wrap of metal over narrative succeeds grandly.In the Bridge, the usual Banksian tropes plonk into Being the requisite names which suggest familiarity but which maintain an air of oddity serve only to estrange, to make the quasi real unreal the preoccupation with war as fundus of the human heart, at root of all Sappy love stories between people Modern day Scotland Amenesia as conventient vehicle to knit together and explain all the above Tightly written or should I say welded, this is probably the Best non M Banks that Banks has done For all its head in the clouds freewheeling, the book doesn t lose its feet the book is firmly undergirt by the monolith...


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