[Epub] ❧ 草枕 [Kusamakura] ➛ Natsume Sōseki – Thomashillier.co.uk

草枕 [Kusamakura] In Una Collana Chiamata Biblioteca Neri Pozza, In Cui Coltiviamo Ilsogno Di Una Nostra Piccola Biblioteca Ideale, Non Poteva Mancare Quest Opera Di Natsume Soseki Che, Fin Dal Suo Apparire, Stata Oggetto Di Ammirazione Incondizionata Presso Un Ampia Schiera Di Illustri Lettori D Oriente E D Occidente Negli Ultimi Anni Della Sua Vita, Ad Esempio, Glenn Gould Ne Fece Il Suo Vero E Proprio Livre De Chevet Nel 1982, Alla Radio Della CBC, Lesse L Intero Primo Capitolo Del Libro E, In Un Suo Breve Commento, Sottoline Come Questo Romanzo Del 1906, Opera Del Pi Grande Scrittore Del Giappone Moderno, Riassuma Esemplarmente La Condizione Stessa Dell Artista.Straordinariamente Simile Nella Struttura Narrativa A Un Altra Grande Opera Del Secolo Appena Trascorso La Passeggiata Di Robert Walser, Apparsa Appena Undici Anni Pi Tardi , Guanciale D Erba Narra Di Un Giovane Artista, Pittore E Poeta, Che Si Avventura Per Un Ameno Sentiero Di Montagna Di Un Piccolo Villaggio Giapponese.Lungo Il Cammino, In Un Atmosfera Incantata, Incontra Viandanti Solitari, Contadini, Paesani, Nobili A Cavallo E Ogni Specie D Umanit , Finch , Sorpreso Dalla Pioggia, Si Rifugia In Una Piccola Casa Da T Tra I Monti Qui, Dalla Dolce Voce Della Vecchia Tenutaria, Apprende La Storia Della Fanciulla Di Nakoi, Che Ebbe La Sfortuna Di Essere Desiderata Da Due Uomini E Andare In Sposa A Quello Che Lei Non Amava Il Giorno In Cui Part , Il Suo Cavallo Si Arrest Sotto Il Ciliegio Davanti Alla Casa Da T , E Dei Fiori Caddero Qua E L , Come Macchie Sul Suo Candido VestitoCome Un Viandante Qualsiasi, Col Suo Guanciale D Erba Insieme, Il Cuscino Di Chi Va Per Il Mondo E Una Grande Metafora Del Viaggio Di Ogni Uomo Alla Ricerca Di Se Stesso L Artista Raccoglie Questa E Altre Meravigliose Storie Lungo Il Suo Peregrinare, Semplicemente Per Ubbidire Al Suo Modesto E Sublime Compito Rasserenare Il Mondo E Arricchire Il Cuore Degli Uomini.


About the Author: Natsume Sōseki

Natsume S seki , February 9, 1867 December 9, 1916 , born Natsume Kinnosuke , was a Japanese novelist He is best known for his novels Kokoro, Botchan, I Am a Cat and his unfinished work Light and Darkness He was also a scholar of British literature and composer of haiku, kanshi, and fairy tales From 1984 until 2004, his portrait appeared on the front of the Japanese 1000 yen not



10 thoughts on “草枕 [Kusamakura]

  1. says:

    And when its difficulties intensify, you find yourself longing to leave that world and dwell in some easier one and then, when you understand at last the difficulties will dog you wherever you may live, this is when poetry and art are born For the very first time on a murky morning, I saw a set of colours come alive on the wall of my living room The orderly row of comatose crayons suddenly sprang like a newborn foal twirling on the pasty canvass Amid the angry voices of my parents I giggled as I indulged in my very first act of vandalism The fiery red miraculously transformed into a royal shade of purple with the touch of blue, the yellow gave birth to orange when it embraced the stylish red I was captivated by this odd looking rainbow and then from that day onward, I scribbled and drew on every empty space found on paper, walls and even on my bare palms The razor sharp pencil became a tyrant and I a lawless anarchist, each forming and defying the norms on their own terms Over the years, common sense shackled my fearlessness and creativity became another tomb in my life Soseki s words made me realize that until now I had failed to distinguish the art that always shaped in front of me It is not mandatory to entrust one s thoughts to paper art is right in front of you In the assorted colours of your world, let your eyes be the naked canvass in which an artist s creates a masterpiece, as you conjur...


  2. says:

    Yes, a poem, a painting, can draw the story of troubles from a troubled world and lay in its place a blessed realm before our grateful eyes Natsume Soseki, KusamakuraNatsume Soseki might soon be a new favourite of mine This is a book I read after reading Praj s wonderful review.Kusamakura tells the story of an unnamed artist looking for artistic inspiration while walking through the Japanese mountains, and his encounters at the on sen Japanese hotspring where he encounters the beautiful Nami Kusamakura is one of the most beautiful books I ve read all year, one that hooked me from the first sentence This book was a philosophical look at poetry, nature, beauty and art from a Japanese perspective, often contrasting that perspective a lot favourably than with other perspectives Though not an artist myself, as an art lover I could appreciate the opportunity of looking into the mind of an artist, and viewing his thought process As trite as this may sound I realize that Japanese literature speaks to my soul on a deeper level I really think it has a lot to do with my introvertism Authors like Soseki, Tanizaki and Mishima have a very introspective way of looking at things, beauty in particular, and it s something I can really relate to.Several adjectives came to mind while I read this Delicate was one,calming and elegant were others I didn t agree with Soseki s negative critique of Chinese art and European litera...


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  4. says:

    A thirst for the purity of an openness that eschews all restrictions of internal will or external codes The rare locale of an artist A place of imagination and dreaming existing apart from the vulgarity of movement the world Seeking it removes any chance of finding it The locale is something which arrives A splendor of reverie for those patient enough to wait A book that replenishes the inspiration of awaiting.We travel with the narrator, a 30 year old Japanese artist His steps takes him into a valley, an Inn where he is the only visitor What is to be sought in this quiet splendor is, what is an artist How is this manifested within a person, how is this manifested within a person s response to the world.Residing within his mind , his thoughts which exist between the breaths of prose, verse carrying pearls of metaphor, we live through his travails, temptations, experiences, and experiences of experience A dedicated pilgrim of the mind he has that unique gift to express the ephemeral in, beautific language while carrying out a plot not inserted but grown from seed and carefully tended.My only complaint, a small one, there was a couple of time the descriptive language slid over the borderline into overuse and slowed the narrative A loss of a 0 5 stars However, due to the reading of this slender novel memoir autobiographical interlude travelogue, I understand rather than know, one may be an accomplished artist without painting, composing, writing, playing a musical inst...


  5. says:

    If The Gate reminds me of the evanescence of autumn, Kusamakura reminds me of the drowsiness of spring the presence of the soul is forgotten, and the human spirit is forged into nature and elevated to be the realm of pure poetry Unlike The Gate which is so full of weariness and melancholy, Kusamakura has abundant elements of sarcasm and humor which makes it sound like the inner voice of an adolescent boy who is still trying to imagine the immortal beauty of his own self Adolescent years, still unconvinced of common sense and, knowing nothing about weariness, always poised for action like a Classical Greek sculpture I can see the transition of Soseki from his early sarcasm to his late melancholy in this novel The narrator starts with an energetic searching for poetry but gradually slips into inaction During the past eleven days I spent in Japan, I see a culture of both confidence and inaction It is a country satisfied with itself and not so ...


  6. says:

    A wandering look at the creation of poetry Slow and meditative This short little book treats life with a sort of nostalgia for something that was, or might not ever have been It relays the process of creating a poem, of finding inspiration, of rebirth and renewal and of wandering the countryside to escape the neuroticism and fart smellers of the big city.As you might have guessed from the last remark, this does not mean that S seki s tale is wholly humorless and austere On the contrary Our narrator poet talks about how easy it is to write haiku, saying that it can be done on the toilet The scene with the garrulous barber is a real treat as well, with the loud man hacking apart the narrator s face as he chatters away in the serene atmosphere of the countryside.The plot barely exists, and instead the reflection is in thoughts and details The existence of this world is in something that i...


  7. says:

    Clearly I am thinking about nothing I am most certainly looking at nothing Since nothing is present to my consciousness to beguile me with its color and movement, I have not become one with anything Yet I am in motion motion neither within the world nor outside it simply motion Neither motion as flower, nor as bird, nor motion in relation to another human, just ecstatic emotion To me, that is the nonemotion from Kusamakura of life as nature as art as life as poetry In my own hazed definitions I tell myself that it s my human naturism, as well as outside naturism like normal people would call it Walking outside after a storm and the senses pick up the clean smells of the earth and sky No one else is around so things don t matter in the way of consequences I feel cheesey trying to name it Haikus Kusamakura is Soseki s haiku novel Nature It is what Robert Bresson said about not chasing poetry and letting it slip in your walking joints as ellipises he said it better than that, I m paraphrasing That s it Ellipsis motion Kusamakura is my ellipsis motion novel I simply gaze at it with pleasure The word gaze is perhaps a little strong Rather say that the phantom slips easily in under my closed eyelids It comes gliding into the room, traveling soundlessly over the matting like a spirit lady walking on water This The unnamed protagonist sets off into the other corners of his world to forget the self interest found in...


  8. says:

    This is a beautiful book which takes place a metaphorical and physical mountain climb I would consider it Soseki s interior facing work and one of incredible zen like wisdom and imagery Again, do not expect laughing geisha and dancing no actors but rather the mature musings of a Japanese master writer grappling with middle age at 39 Here is an example of his irony laden highly reflective pose chosen at random I eased my law abiding buttocks down on the cushioning grass One could remain in such a place as this for five or six days without the fear of anybody making a complaint That is the beauty of Nature It is true that if forced Nature can act ruthlessness and without remorse, but on the otherhand she is free from all perfidy, since her attitude is the same towards everyone who harasses her.The story does include some other characters and a little bit of shadow theatre and is delig...


  9. says:

    A meditation on life and beauty beneath a kaleidoscope of colours and images, a paean to beauty set against a harlequin shimmer of colours, from the reflections of a sun light on a the leaves of a tree or the bucolic blooming on the whimsically white flower petals beneath the inky blue night sky The incandescence of the night sky, the warbling of the sky lark beneath leaves of a tree leaden with rain, the pale, indescribable iridescence of sun light on a mountain slope, the poetry leaden atmosphere of Japan, these are the images which dominate Kusamakura, a kind of homage to the Chinese poetry and haiku, which were concerned with the natural world than human psychology as the narrator states, beneath the indifference of nature lies an acceptance which is not possible in the human world, a freedom from the endless restrictions of society As I get back to my feet, my eyes take in the distant scene To the left of the path soars a mountain peak, in shape rather like an inverted bucket From foot to summit it is entirely covered in what could either by cypress or cedar, whose blue black mass is stippled with the pale pink of swathes of blossoming cherry The distance is so hazy that all appears as a single wash of blurred shapes and colours The story follows an intinerate artist as he traverses various parts of Japan As well as his appreciation of the natural world, the artist ponders the meaning of art art is the vehicle by which people can recognise...


  10. says:

    Beautiful Joyous Sharp, clear, precise Soseki s best, I think, for its freedom, for its glow True, from here on near everything he wrote had the magic, but like Kafka s his characters were hemmed in, in darkness Here, from when the unnamed I appears on a mountain path until he disappears at a train station as the world calls from down the tracks, all is glittering I couldn t read this when I was down it demanded I engage with it, bring heart to it, enjoy it I know not everyone few people, even will feel this The 150 page mountain idyll of a painter who never paints A haiku novel preoccupied with stillness A cod philosophic essay on alienation, the artist s role in society, Japan versus the west, the nonemotional Not that it s plotless the plot, though simple, is taut, engaging or experimental it is, but subtly not for Soseki vulgar flash and histrionics , but it s quiet, thirst quenchingly so For Soseki, anything less anything louder, brasher, less disciplined would be a failure But where in The Gate or Light and Darkness this reserve might constrain him, here it sets him free Where The Gate takes place until its pained Zen temple denouement in a virtual burrow wintry Tokyo unseen outside Kusamakura is spring, mountains and sea, a wide chessboard on which his proud sharp carved characters which, as Eddie Watkins says, are always chess pieces move with full extended...


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