[[ KINDLE ]] ❁ The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves Author Stephen Grosz – Thomashillier.co.uk



10 thoughts on “The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves

  1. says:

    It s very Freudian If you a fan of the psychoanalytic process and the insights it draws hopefully leading to that ah ha moment followed by a change to hopefully less distressing behaviour, then you are going to enjoy these stories.Being the rather non spiritual pragmatist that I am, I m into existential psychology and prefer the books and writing, the beautiful, soaring, hopeful writing of Irvin D Yalom Nevertheless there are some interesting tales of people s maladaptions and how they got that way as well as their resolution It lost me though on the chapter where the author is freaking that he can t remember his dreams For a psychotherapist not to remember his dreams it s like a total failure, and it failed me too But that could be because I have an aversion to listening or reading about other people s dreams and might not be a problem for anyone else As an aside, I would really like to tell people my dreams though, beca...


  2. says:

    These subtle, fascinating case studies are psychoanalysis condensed They run about 6 or so pages each Everything inessential has been stripped away We get the problem, the diagnosis, and the resolution or its semblance very quickly There s the nine year old with autism whose hyper acting out includes spitting in his analyst s the author s face five times a week for a year and a half How far can one s compassion go Or the HIV positive patient who can do little than sleep during his sessions When the author presents his case at a conference, an American doctor asks Why are you wasting your time with this patient He s going to die Why not help someone who s got a future The author is outraged And as it turns out, the protease inhibitors arrive in time and the patient lives for many years, is in fact still alive at the time the book is published The essays are so lean, so fleet of foot and this is somehow connected this brevity, this concision to thei...


  3. says:

    It has been a while since I felt so conflicted about a book, so torn in two radically different directions Fittingly, I found that I lost and found myself over and over in these pages I d be nodding with appreciative agreement one moment, then furrowing my eyebrows in frustration the next The bottom line is that Grosz s slim collection of stories from his years as a psychoanalyst is engrossing and rich, even if it often lacks the additional details that would bring these cursory glimpses into troubled lives fully into the light If you are looking to challenge your assumptions about how the mind works or what the best methods are for dealing with the most difficult aspects of human experience, this is a good opportunity to do so.To begin, I want to air some major grievances There are several aspects of this book that infuriated me and prevented me from fully embracing Grosz s attitudes and methods Exploring these narratives made me realize exactly how much my attitudes about the mind have changed sin...


  4. says:

    Cultural Compensation The Examined Life strikes me as a re incarnation of Scott Peck s The Road Less Travelled which was published 40 years ago before Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher decreed the non existence of society Both books are written with the same structure of patient case studies They contain the same histories of development of the writers into therapeutic maturity the same essential message of human psychic complexity and mystery and even some almost identical patient accounts This doesn t make The Examined Life redundant, only, I m afraid, another voice crying in the wilderness of a society which doesn t actually register its implications.One of the unexpected side effects of psychotherapy is the establishment of two independent Cartesian worlds the world of everyday life in which people act stupidly as if driven by hidden forces of self destruction over which they have no control and the world of therapy in which the underlying purpose of such behavior is uncovered and found to be entirely rational The first worl...


  5. says:

    I just had to take off a star from the ranking I gave this book yesterday Grosz knows how to tell a story, but I wanted depth in the case studies and analyses Everything seemed too simple, too easily resolved, too basic.


  6. says:

    I picked this up because I thought it would speak to my interest in how we construct narratives in order to interact with the world and place ourselves within reality And psychoanalysis is a funny one for looking at that kind of thing It always gives me the heebie jeebies a bit as it seems to put the psychoanalyst in a similar position to a priest he who is somehow qualified and able to reach into what is necessarily unknown the subconscious or, in the case of the priest, the word of god and interpret it for us mere mortals This puts the analyst in a position of power that I m often uncomfortable with when what they re supposed to be doing is normally to liberate someone who is deeply troubled and particularly vulnerable psychologically.Plus, psychoanalysis relies on being done very regularly over a very long period of time a suspiciously lucrative job for an analyst..I met the author this summer and he absolutely blew me away with his warmth, goofy enthusiasm and attentiveness, making me think that perhaps psychoanalysis isn t all that bad after all And so I thought I d get off my suspicious high horse and read his book.AND I hear you ask We...


  7. says:

    This is a terrific little book very affecting and powerful, and it came at just the right time for me.It s essentially a series of vignettes from the case histories of a Freudian psychoanalyst short chapters on themes of loss, love, lies, sadness, death and so on I confess that I am rabidly sceptical about the basis of Freudian analysis, but these stories are so touching and thought provoking that my ideological preferences were rendered unimportant What s so powerful about this book is the way that it foregrounds and sharpens the focus on the stories that you tell yourself about who you are, why you do things, and what the meaning of your life is And, importantly, it helps to bring to mind the unconscious or deeply embedded and invisible behaviours that you emb...


  8. says:

    The reviews of The Examined Life on gr are pretty mixed, and I can understand why These pieces are short, intriguing, frustrating Sometimes they go too deep in the sense of reading too much into behavior and constructing far fetched overly worn psychoanalytic metaphors and insinuating them into a situation where they might not be all that helpful And some of the essays are barely constructed, the material relatively unexamined All of this said, I enjoyed the book It reminds me how meaningful it can be to sit in a room with another person and locate what is present in a dynamic and not being addressed To name an attitude or behavior that is both slyly flying under the radar and somehow longing to be named, can be a life changing event So many of the troubles that harm relationships or keep unhealthy relationships in place, are the unspoken and yet incredibly powerful contracts we make, either because we are in familiar and therefore safe even if unsafe relationship territory, or because we don t know how to value our own experiences, or we are afraid of conflict and change What I found most meaningful in this book was reading about these moments of noticing and naming dynamics that happens in the context of therapy and relates to things happening outside of therapy Sometimes getting unstuck is a matter of naming what is happening at a present moment rather than trying to come up with elaborate metaphors for one s past.So, all in all I think this is not a...


  9. says:

    Review after the third read I never read a book than once, but this is the third time for me to read this one sigh Still, it s one of my favorite psychotherapy books Even though I m not a psychoanalyst, and I m of a humanistic and cognitive behavioral therapist, I find this book to be a treasure on a personal and professional level You will find yourself somewhere in this book You will come face to face with some of your fears you might continue to ignore your insecurities, or maybe reach an insight about a struggle in your life This book is all about the untold stories that end up shaping who we are Some parts brought me to tears, other parts made me unable to breathe properly for a while Review after the first read One of my ultimate favorite books I can read it a hundred times and I ll learn new things eve...


  10. says:

    In the bumpf on the back it says that these are aphoristic and elegant stories.Here then are the aphorisms I have derived from each chapter in order with none missing Trauma that is experienced in pre speech years can lead to silence inability to express and or destructive behaviour acting out in later life Making jokes about problems can bring temporary relief but can block a better understanding of the situation Praising specific positive behaviour rather than just praising in general can be good way to help someone to grow Engaging with painful emotions can enable us to know and examine what hurts us and why but to what end Before you try to address a person s obsession with X, make sure that X is real or how to turn someone s case history into a funny anecdote Not all of these stories are ameanable to aphorismation, unless it s something general like sometimes a person s world turns on a very small pivot or something specific like sometimes bedwetting can be the only way you can get ...


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The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves The Examined Life How We Lose And Find Ourselves Free Download Author Stephen Grosz Ivogue.co.uk A Sunday Times BestsellerLonglisted For The Guardian First Book AwardA Radio 4 Book Of The WeekThis Book Is About Learning To Live.In Simple Stories Of Encounter Between A Psychoanalyst And His Patients, The Examined Life Reveals How The Art Of Insight Can Illuminate The Most Complicated, Confounding And Human Of Experiences.These Are Stories About Our Everyday Lives They Are About The People We Love And The Lies That We Tell The Changes We Bear, And The Grief Ultimately, They Show Us Not Only How We Lose Ourselves But How We Might Find Ourselves Too.