УпырьСемья вурдалаков MOBI ↠

УпырьСемья вурдалаков ➷ [Reading] ➹ УпырьСемья вурдалаков By Aleksey Konstantinovich Tolstoy ➬ – Thomashillier.co.uk Maruis d'Ufré a young French diplomat finds himself in a small Serbian village in the house of an old peasant named Gorcha The host is absent he left the house ten days ago along with some other men Maruis d'Ufré a young French diplomat finds himself in a small Serbian village in the house of an old peasant named Gorcha The host is absent he left the house ten days ago along with some other men to hunt for a Turk outlaw Alibek Upon leaving he told his sons Georges and Pierre that they should wait for him for ten days sharp and should he come a minute later kill him by driving a stake through his heart for then he’d be not a man but a vourdalak vampireThe novella became the basis for I Wurdulak one of the three parts of Mario Bava's film I Tre volti della paura also known as Black Sabbath featuring Boris Karloff.


10 thoughts on “УпырьСемья вурдалаков

  1. Orçun Orçun says:

    As I continue to read classic vampire strories this one seemed to me the most accomplished story so far in the sense of creating an eerie atmosphere and well developed narration Aleksey Konstantinovich Tolstoy 1817 1875 was little known writer cousine of well known writer Leo Tolstoy not to be confused with Aleksey Nikolayevich Tolstoy another writer from the family who was born on 1882 There is nothing new in this story but the gloomy experience is almost cinematic and maybe that’s why it took attention of Italian horror movie directors in 1960s 1970s The emphasis on contagious nature of vampirism and emotional conflicts of protagonists are very well captured Here we face the pure romance pure terror in the village life


  2. Tim Pendry Tim Pendry says:

    Originally written in French in 1839 only four years after Gautier's 'Clarimonde' what is interesting about Alexei Tolstoy's story Alexei was brother to the famous Leo is that it returns to the East European origins of the vampire legend and presents us with real horrorIt was not actually published until 1884 in Russian but preceded a rather poorly received novella 'The Vampire' that was published in 1841 This poor reception resulted in three other vampire works including this one not being brought forward for publicationThe vampire fascinated the romantics and the Russians had received a translation of Polidori's work in 1828 so the initial interest is unsurprisingIn fact 'The Family of the Vourdalak' still stands up as an essay not only in horror creating the image of vampirism as a sort of plague but in recreating the callous emotional world of the young Russian aristocrat in the face of peasant beauty and in the use of folkloric atmosphere


  3. Christine Watson Christine Watson says:

    Listened to David Tennant's reading of this tale The story is uite compelling sitting on the fence between gothic horror and thriller Everything flows nicely and keeps you interested as each new development is revealed I would suggest this story to anyone looking for a short piece to read to satisfy their horrorthriller needs


  4. K. Anna Kraft K. Anna Kraft says:

    I've done my best to arrange my takeaway thoughts into a haiku The ripple effect Of uelling better judgementHarms than you know


  5. Forked Radish Forked Radish says:

    A good vampire story ruined by its discommodious love story in which its author mistakes Don Juanism for romanticism


  6. Daniel Mallo Falcón Daniel Mallo Falcón says:

    It doesn't deserve your time


  7. Marlee Marlee says:

    A wonderfully creepy and intriguing vampire story Perfect for Halloween


  8. Vishnu Mishra Vishnu Mishra says:

    Nice Gothic More of a thrillerless of a horror maybe that's my vindication It was fun going through this one I had seen movies until now but I am a novice vampire stories reader Anyways all those you wanna enjoy bit of thrill and chill down their spine with hairs on neck standing upright experience may go for this one Enjoy reading ciao


  9. Bbrown Bbrown says:

    A fine short horror story not terribly original but with some good descriptive writing in places


  10. Patrícia Patrícia says:

    A K Tolstoy convinced me by the way he wrote both stories Upir is a nice tale but Semiá Vurdalaka was by far my favourite


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