➸ Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History Download ➿ Author Robert E. Sherwood – Thomashillier.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History

  1. says:

    This is a magnificent biography of Harry Hopkins and Franklin Roosevelt Most of the book is on the war years, starting in 1939 and this means over eight hundred pages And it is muchabout Harry Hopkins than Franklin Roosevelt.Harry Hopkins was the New Deal person for President Roosevelt during the Depression He was chief of the WPA Works Progress Administration of the New Deal era and this is only one of the many relief programs he was involved in But during the war years he didn This is a magnificent biography of Harry Hopkins and Franklin Roosevelt Most of the book is on the war years, starting in 1939 and this means over eight hundred pages And it is muchabout Harry Hopkins than Franklin Roosevelt.Harry Hopkins was the New Deal person for President Roosevelt during the Depression He was chief of the WPA Works Progress Administration of the New Deal era and this is only one of the many relief programs he was involved in But during the war years he didn t have a job title He served as the personal adviser to the President in fact he lived in the White House for over three years Hopkins was a dynamo an action oriented person who would ruthlessly cut through red tape and bypass bureaucratic boundaries With Hopkins things got done, whether it was making jobs during the Depression or sending Lend Lease materials over to the embattled Allies And this was regardless of the cost which lead to much criticism of Harry Hopkins.Through much of these years Hopkins was ill, but he still travelled relentlessly, with his load of medications, as a personal emissary of the President He died in January, 1946.This is an essential book that gives a deeper understanding of key political events of World War II Hopkins was at most of them from being the first U.S representative to visit Churchill in England in January, 1941 and going to Moscow to meet with Stalin in July of 1941 By representative he was directly mandated by Roosevelt to speak on behalf of the President Hopkins was also at the conferences at Casablanca, Teheran, and Yalta plus the many that were in the U.S during Churchill s many visits.Many of the excursions to these far flung areas during war time read like adventure yarns For example when Hopkins and Roosevelt set off for Casablanca they journeyed for two nights from Washington DC to Miami by train Then took a plane that stopped at Trinidad, then flew onto Belem in Brazil, from there to Banjul in Gambia at the time called Bathurst off the coast of Africa where they took a tour in a whale motor boat and finally boarded another plane for the last trek to Casablanca The Hopkins journey from London to Moscow in 1941 was evenfraught with danger This book was written in 1948 and is very eloquent The author met many of the key players, besides the two in the title George Marshall, Dwight Eisenhower, Eleanor Roosevelt He had access to all the notes of Harry Hopkins that were made during his travels and conferences We get many keen observations for example of the similarities and differences in the personalities of Roosevelt and Churchill The author was part of a team of speech writers for Roosevelt and we gain insights of that process.The author is somewhat in awe of the Roosevelt era, which is something I don t mind One can see clearly, in retrospect, how the democratic allies Churchill and Roosevelt did not realize that Stalin was a dictator and not interested in upholding democratic values human rights, elections This may be excused or understood from the point of view that Stalin s Soviet Union was needed to defeat Nazi Germany.All and all a wonderful book with a personal view of this tumultuous time.Page 730 my book With the exception of Eisenhower and Nimitz, there was no theater commander in the war who did not feel that he was the most neglected, most abused and most basely cheated of them all, and that if it hadn t been for Certain Sinister Influences in High Places his theater would have been recognized as the decisive battleground and he would have been given top priority in the allocation of men and materiel.


  2. says:

    During the years Harry Hopkins was a guest in the White House, he was generally considered a sinister figure, a backstairs intriguer, a Iowan combination of Rasputin, Machiavelli and Svengali The one who hated him weren t always Roosevelt s enemies Many of FDR s closest friends and associates passionately disliked Hopkins and resented the extraordinary position of influence and authority he held He was undeniably a political liability to Roosevelt, a handy target for any kind of attacks dir During the years Harry Hopkins was a guest in the White House, he was generally considered a sinister figure, a backstairs intriguer, a Iowan combination of Rasputin, Machiavelli and Svengali The one who hated him weren t always Roosevelt s enemies Many of FDR s closest friends and associates passionately disliked Hopkins and resented the extraordinary position of influence and authority he held He was undeniably a political liability to Roosevelt, a handy target for any kind of attacks directed at the President many people wondered why Roosevelt even kept him around However, the Presidential aide who developed in the war years and who rendered a service to his country which will never even vaguely be appreciated was Roosevelt s own creation FDR purposefully educated Hopkins in politics and gave him immense powers of decision for no other reason but that he trusted and needed him A welfare worker and tactless reformer, Hopkins was very different from Roosevelt in all aspects, but he possessed some qualities, which the President enjoyed Hopkins knew instinctively when to ask, when to be quiet, when to press, and when to hold back For Roosevelt, Harry Hopkins was the perfect ambassador He didn t even know the meaning of the word protocol When he saw a red tape, he just pulled out the old garden shears and snipped it And when he was talking to some foreign dignitary, he knew how to slump back in his chair and put his feet on the conference table and say, Oh yeah.In the final years, a special bond had developed between Roosevelt and Hopkins, probably due to the fact that both men had fought with death at close range FDR didn t talk much about the loneliness of high office, but as a naturally sociable person, he wanted to get away from his job now and then, so when he could choose his own company, he preferred to be with old friends and family, which had nothing to do with government Hopkins, however, achieved his favored position before his encounter with death, and indeed he was not reluctant to use his friendship with the President to pursue his own line of action Interestingly, the author of this amazing book was a personal acquaintance of Hopkins and knew that he was planning to write a memoir about FDR When Harry Hopkins passed away, his son asked Robert E Sherwood to finish the book But Sherwood decided to create his own one instead of faking Harry Hopkins, and he did it very, very well Roosevelt and Hopkins An Intimate History has the elements of a biography, a memoir, a history, and a novel at once Humorous, detailed, and with brilliant sketches of all characters, it is a masterfully written story of those two imminent men s friendship, and it exceeded my expectations immensely Five stars


  3. says:

    An intimate narrative of the life and public service of the man who was likely FDR s closest friend provides a ring side seat to the New Deal and the Second World War For those interested in the roles of FDR, Churchill, Stalin, et al during the pivotal days of 1940 4, this is esstential reading.


  4. says:

    I found this book compelling and not a slog through the almost 1000 pages Who would have thought this could have been so interesting Amazing detail of FDR and Hopkin s work together as well as minute details of meetings,conferences,and plans for Lend Lease as well as plans for the end of the war It details how much people revered FDR but the ways he had to deal with the isolationists Shows how politic and international relations worked as well as had many human anecdotes which made the perso I found this book compelling and not a slog through the almost 1000 pages Who would have thought this could have been so interesting Amazing detail of FDR and Hopkin s work together as well as minute details of meetings,conferences,and plans for Lend Lease as well as plans for the end of the war It details how much people revered FDR but the ways he had to deal with the isolationists Shows how politic and international relations worked as well as had many human anecdotes which made the personalities of FDR, Churchill, Stalin and various Generals come alive


  5. says:

    Roosevelt and Hopkins An Intimate History is Robert Sherwood s 1948 Pulitzer Prize winning biography of Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Hopkins a close friend and adviser to FDR The author was a successful playwright who served as one of FDR s speechwriters alongside Hopkins for nearly five years Sherwood died in 1955 at the age of 59.Sherwood wrote this lengthy biography at the request of the Hopkins family following Harry s death in 1946 After two Roosevelt and Hopkins An Intimate History is Robert Sherwood s 1948 Pulitzer Prize winning biography of Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Hopkins a close friend and adviser to FDR The author was a successful playwright who served as one of FDR s speechwriters alongside Hopkins for nearly five years Sherwood died in 1955 at the age of 59.Sherwood wrote this lengthy biography at the request of the Hopkins family following Harry s death in 1946 After two years of exhaustive research including access to Hopkins s uniquely insightful and revealing personal papers this 934 page tome was published Esteemed biographer David McCullough recently confessed in a New York Times interview that Roosevelt and Hopkins is one of his two favorite presidential related biographies.However, while its title suggests this is a dual biography of FDR and Harry Hopkins or at least an examination of their relationship it is muchfocused on Hopkins than Roosevelt And in many respects it is not a biography at all it islike a doctoral thesis offering a detailed behind the scenes look at the Roosevelt administration s prosecution of World War II.Enormous value accrues from the fact the author knew FDR and Hopkins personally But Sherwood also knew Eleanor Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Dwight Eisenhower and several other important characters in this cast with varying levels of familiarity As a result, the narrative is extremely well informed and offers a bird s eye view of history from the inside out.The first one third of the book covering ground preceding US involvement in World War II is exceptional, and here the book proves nearly impossible to put down These chapters are like sitting in a comfortable chair listening to an old sage tell stories Sherwood s writing is engrossing and eloquent, if a bit dated These early chapters provided one of the most enjoyable dense reading experiences I can remember.Most of the book s thirty six chapters, however, focus on the war years While there is much of interest in these pages, the pace slows significantly and the text becomes muchdifficult to navigate Where the book s earliest chapters often focus on the fascinating characters surrounding FDR, the narrative in these later chapters devolves into an extremely detailed almost day by day and blow by blow account of the war, with a clear diplomatic, rather than military, emphasis.But while such a unique perspective could be interesting, the broad strategic strokes of World War II prove elusive and the tops of the trees are seldom observed Instead, the focus is on the forest floor with all its microscopic minutiae Much of this was and presumably is of great interest to historians, but many readers will become lost in a sea of unfamiliar detail The chapters relating to Hopkins s visits with Winston Churchill and Stalin, however, are extremely rewarding.For fans of efficient history it will be regrettable that Sherwood did not resist the temptation to frequently embed lengthy blocks of primary source material in the text Rarely are therethan a few consecutive pages without multi paragraph or even multi page quotes from letters, memos, speeches and cables These add color and substance to the discussion but may well account for one third orof the book s length In a crisply edited 600 page form this book might be incredible.Overall, Roosevelt and Hopkins offers the reader a unique and richly detailed behind the scenes examination of the Roosevelt presidency with an emphasis on 1940 1945 when the author worked in the administration Readers seeking a modern, easy flowing narrative or a comprehensive dual biography will be disappointed But as a second or third book on FDR, Sherwood provides the patient reader with a front row seat to some of America s most dramatic history.Overall rating 3 stars


  6. says:

    I just finished reading Roosevelt and Hopkins by Robert Sherwood published in 1948 Anderson, a playwright who had become a Roosevelt speechwriter, worked with both Roosevelt and Hopkins and had all of Hopkins notes and papers as source material He started out to write a conventional biography of the 2 men, but realized he was so close to his subject that he would write in the first person A brilliant decision because he was able to put the reader unusually close to his subjects, with only a b I just finished reading Roosevelt and Hopkins by Robert Sherwood published in 1948 Anderson, a playwright who had become a Roosevelt speechwriter, worked with both Roosevelt and Hopkins and had all of Hopkins notes and papers as source material He started out to write a conventional biography of the 2 men, but realized he was so close to his subject that he would write in the first person A brilliant decision because he was able to put the reader unusually close to his subjects, with only a bit of downside because he was able to quote so much The book is 934 pages of smallish print This book was assigned reading in my sopho American history class in college, and it was an eye opener for me Part of my interest stems from the fact that it was on my parents bookshelf and I remembered my father reading it which convinced me my parents knew important things after all I too enjoyed the book though my decision to reread it came about when I considered how far I had come since 1960 1 when I was a sopho and how manyconnections I could make if I read it now Back then I identified my father, a tall, slim, straight haired, Midwesterner, with Harry Hopkins I see now that my father was really like me, determined to understand our nation s history, particularly in this period My father lived through that time I came along at the end Fittingly, an early memory is of walking in the park across from our house on a spring day which can t have been all that warm because8 was wearing a sweater Church bells were ringing, I asked why since it wasn t Sunday He told me the President had died


  7. says:

    I decided to read Roosevelt and Hopkins An Intimate History after seeing David McCullough recommend it as one of his all time favorite books Having read most of McCullough s books, I can see why this is one of his favorites, and clearly McCullough learned from Sherwood Sherwood s book is a comprehensive biography of Harry Hopkins, one of the architects of the New Deal, a person who putpeople back to work than most presidents, who served as Secretary of Labor, and who was Franklin Roos I decided to read Roosevelt and Hopkins An Intimate History after seeing David McCullough recommend it as one of his all time favorite books Having read most of McCullough s books, I can see why this is one of his favorites, and clearly McCullough learned from Sherwood Sherwood s book is a comprehensive biography of Harry Hopkins, one of the architects of the New Deal, a person who putpeople back to work than most presidents, who served as Secretary of Labor, and who was Franklin Roosevelt s most trusted adviser during the Second World War No one could ever accuse Sherwood of not being thorough the book is massive and took me a couple of months to read Sherwood s accomplishment is a fantastic model for students of history, yet it suffers from a lack of editing Too often, Sherwood provides pages and pages of primary source material in the text rather than selecting the most important sentences and then providing a summary of the remainder I got the feeling that Sherwood didn t want to leave anything out, and he certainly didn t But too frequently he provides far too much source material where the primary sources don t really add to the narrative He would have benefitted from a competent editor That criticism aside, the book is fascinating for anyone interested in FDR, the New Deal, and a World War II Hopkins played a key role in Roosevelt s presidency, and the book capably describes just how important Sherwood is at his best when describing specific events such as Hopkins meetings with Churchill and Stalin you can tell he was trained as a journalist In these cases, he effectively advances a narrative Sherwood is less successful when outlining less concrete ideas and policies, and this is where a good editor would have been helpful Overall, great for those interested in FDR and this era of history


  8. says:

    Absolutely fascinating, and it made me ponder how in hell FDR kept his sanity under the monumental pressure of the events of 1939 45 While we know how it ended, this book takes you inside the highest reaches of power while the war unfolded Also mind boggling, the political invective he and Hopkins endured makes the Tea Party nonsense birthers, etc seem like child s play.I read this book after finishing Roosevelt s Second Act The Election of 1940 and the Politics of War by Richard Moe, w Absolutely fascinating, and it made me ponder how in hell FDR kept his sanity under the monumental pressure of the events of 1939 45 While we know how it ended, this book takes you inside the highest reaches of power while the war unfolded Also mind boggling, the political invective he and Hopkins endured makes the Tea Party nonsense birthers, etc seem like child s play.I read this book after finishing Roosevelt s Second Act The Election of 1940 and the Politics of War by Richard Moe, which was also spell binding


  9. says:

    Actually a great book, but far too much detail for my present interest


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Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History Because It Offers A Rare Insight Into The Workings Of Franklin Delano Roosevelt S Wartime Diplomacy, This Book Is The Classic Account Of FDR S Foreign Policy During World War II, Examining How Harry Hopkins, His Friend And Confidant, Became The President S Point Man With Stalin, Churchill, De Gaulle, And Other Allied Leaders It Is The Inside History Of America S Inevitable Wartime Rise As A Great Power, Written In Wonderfully Readable Prose By White House Speechwriter And Prize Winning Playwright Robert Sherwood.