❁ Locos: A Comedy of Gestures (Twentieth Century Classics) kindle Epub ❅ Author Felipe Alfau – Thomashillier.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Locos: A Comedy of Gestures (Twentieth Century Classics)

  1. says:

    Somewhere in Toledo, lost amongst narrow streets, there is the Caf of the Crazy frequented by disused literary characters Bad writers were in the habit of coming to that caf in quest of characters, and I came now and then among them At that particular place one could find some very good secondhand bargains and also some fairly good, cheap, new material.Characters live separately from authors and they wish to be independent and uncontrolled that which is reality for humans is a hallucination Somewhere in Toledo, lost amongst narrow streets, there is the Caf of the Crazy frequented by disused literary characters Bad writers were in the habit of coming to that caf in quest of characters, and I came now and then among them At that particular place one could find some very good secondhand bargains and also some fairly good, cheap, new material.Characters live separately from authors and they wish to be independent and uncontrolled that which is reality for humans is a hallucination for a character Characters have visions of true life they dream reality and then they are lost.There is an episode in the novel called The Butterfly Charmer and in spite of all the declared autonomy of the characters Felipe Alfau like a butterfly charmer makes them perform all the tricks he wants.Spring comes and the winter of our discontent is defeated


  2. says:

    The Short Version An emotional thrill ride, novel in stories stories where the characters rebel, invade other stories, appear under different names, and cause various sorts of mayhem, confusion, and headaches for the author narrator s Nicholls is correct on this one is there ever any doubt As the stories may be read in any order, there s probably no such thing as a view spoiler spoiler hide spoiler Read the Prologue Mary McCarthy s Afterword is optional.The Long Version Identity Si The Short Version An emotional thrill ride, novel in stories stories where the characters rebel, invade other stories, appear under different names, and cause various sorts of mayhem, confusion, and headaches for the author narrator s Nicholls is correct on this one is there ever any doubt As the stories may be read in any order, there s probably no such thing as a view spoiler spoiler hide spoiler Read the Prologue Mary McCarthy s Afterword is optional.The Long Version Identity Sitting with his friend, Dr Jos de los Rios, in the Caf de los Locos, the author narrator character hunts from among the no longer needed characters assembled in the caf before being set upon by an old acquaintance, Fulano, a character who has had incredible trouble ever being noticed by those he encounters Fulano is driven to be famous, recognized, to matter At the suggestion of Dr de los Rios, Fulano attempts to fake a suicide with the goal of attaining some sort of notoriety Attempts The effort backfires in the worst possible way Following another confrontation with Sr de los Rios and the author this is how he refers to himself as a character , Fulano makes one additional stab at immortality But then view spoiler no freakin way hide spoiler It occurs to me that Fulano is almost an anagram for No Alfau hmm.A Character While awaiting the arrival of his host, the author begins a story about Gaston Bejarano, a character known for his rebelliousness and independence with the arrival of his host, the author abandons said story only to have Bejarano assume control and launch out on his own where he meets Lunarito, during a downpour, and who agrees to meeting Gaston at some point in the future Are Gaston Bejarano and Lunarito the same couple seen in the Caf de los Locos No Surely not That was Pepe Bejarano fondling the leg of Lunarito Besides, according to Gaston, he s a character while Lunarito is real When the author regains control of the story, he s faced with a problem he doesn t want to make Lunarito a character in his story he has enough characters , and if he makes herfictional, she s no longer the ideal Gaston so desperately wants, on the other hand, he can t make Gastonreal, because that s not what authors do they create characters For the reader s benefit, it s at this point that the author feels obliged to present the story of how he came to know Gaston It was much earlier on, and through his friend, Dr de los Rios, who was treating Gaston, who was then generally called El Cogote But, wait Hold on Wasn t El Cogote one of the characters at Caf de los Locos Wasn t he the one whose altercation with a woman was interrupted by a nun a very attractive nun Sister Carmela, wasn t it And come to think of it, wasn t the bartender s last name Baez The same as Lunarito s last name It was on a visit to see El Cogote that Dr de los Rios explained El Cogote s precarious condition apparently pre HIPAA , and how as a youth, El Cogote had been separated from his beloved when her father had sent her to live in a convent Their arrival at the home of El Gogote was met by a fat woman in a red kimono who led them down a dark hall to the ailing man s room Carmen, the woman in red, informs them of El Cogote s delirious ravings over a woman he d met who d been murdered, a woman named Lunarito El Cogote relates a nightmare he s had, in which he pushes his sister in a room in the family home, the room the entire had always been afraid of, only to find, when the door was opened, that his sister had aged, had the face of Lunarito, and accused him of having killed her Dreams Whaddaya gonna do Desperately calling out into the house, El Cogote, pleads that Lunarito appear to him before he dies, and she does, and is the woman in red It s at this point that the author is compelled to interrupt his narrative onetime, explaining how Gaston El Cogote , actually came to know Lunarito it was through the author s friend, Don Laureano Baez, and view spoiler did you really think I d tell you everything, or did it just feel that way hide spoilerI m writing these summaries as I read the stories I hereby promise to begin making eachbrief at least, I ll try, fearing for losing your interest and the imposition I might be making on GR real estate Besides, I suspect you re starting to get the picture on how this novel works The Beggar In an unusual decision to abandon a career such as his a never mentioned career , Garcia agrees to take a position offered him by Don Gil Bejarano Gil, the beggar from the Caf de los Locos Bejarano Bejarano Is Bejarano Spanish for Smith as a fingerprint expert um, you may notice the title of the following story With his first payday, then, a month and a half in the future, Garcia must get by on the few coins he has the most valuable of which he accidentally gives a beggar In an attempt to regain those funds, he proceeds to call on the beggar one Don Laureano Baez , where he also meets the beggar s lovely daughter, Lunarito surprised , and totally view spoiler will you never learn hide spoiler Fingerprints Don Gil Bejarano y Roca Gil, the beggar from the Caf de los Locos hopes his brother in law, the Prefect, will eventually lend him the money to publish Gil s father s monograph and his own articles, in a volume that will conclusively demonstrate that his father Don Esteban Bejarano y Ulloa is the single source discoverer of the individuality of fingerprints Gil is driven to the fame that a national awareness of his father s discovery will enable The Bejarano family had been always rather obscure and unimportant Fulano esque At the home Gil shares with his wife, Felisa, and children, Gaston, Pepe, Mignon, and Carmen If Gaston, Pepe, and Carmen the woman in the red kimono, Lunarito, or Sister Carmella were each at the Caf de los Locos, was Mignon in the study with a candlestick an evening with Padre Inocencio caf denizen is interrupted by a visit from the Prefect, who eventually arrests Gil, based on fingerprints verified by Garcia see above on a charge of view spoiler you gotta be kiddin me Still checking Do I need to add a footnote hide spoiler The Wallet When a massive power failure causes a Madrid wide blackout during a 19 international police convention, all the European criminals are drawn to the city for its easy pickings which causes considerable embarrassment for the Prefect An argument with his nephew, Pepe, who has recently been expelled from school in England, is salvaged when the Prefect reveals to Pepe that his brother, Gaston, is now a professional pimp El Cogote As they prepare to go their separate ways for the evening, a bet is wagered on whom will get home safely without being mugged Consequently, view spoiler Chesses H Havarti hide spoiler Chinelato I The Ogre Juan Chinelato aka Se or Ol zaga, and by the way, a giant , after an impoverished life as an orphan in China, lives a very comfortable life in Madrid except for the pesky boys who taunt him every morning One day he makes his way to the home of Don Esteban Bejarano y Ulloa the Spanish discoverer of fingerprints Can Chinelato be the hypothetical Chinaman in Fingerprints II The Black Mandarin Two unnamed characters Dr de los Rios and the narrator author discuss the life of The Black Mandarin aka Juan Chinelato, aka Se or Ol zaga , the reality of his reputation for bigamy, and his history as a showman extraordinaire.III Tia Mariquita Two unnamed characters one, presumably, the author narrator share the story of Ol zaga s last wife the senile Tia Mariquita, as well as Ol zaga s numerous failed businesses to include one with Laureano Baez , and his continued pursuit of Lunarito Both she and her father view spoiler Good grief, we re approaching finales, read the damn book hide spoiler Ol zaga s secretary, Cendreras, has an unfortunate time at the home of Laureano Baez The Necrophil The religious Do a Micaela Valverde, has a love affair with death in fact, she dies frequently and for longer and longer periods of time Her physician, Dr de los Rios, prescribes an abortion, suicide, or view spoiler It s rainin men Hallelujah Snap outta it ain t agonna tell you hide spoiler Her relevance to the overall story, aside from Cendreras being her third husband and view spoiler who the fuck knows hide spoiler A Romance of Dogs I Students The author narrator reveals his identity, claim s the novel s autobiographical origins, describes schooldays with his three friends Julio Cava as called Cava itas , Pepe Bejarano, and one Felipe Alfau he goes on to relate their adoration of Padre Inocenio and Sister Carmela Pepe s sister, Carmen Oh, yeah, couple bad ass dogs torment Gar oops, almost revealed the author narrator, and that woulda been view spoiler Really Still you look hide spoiler II Spring One author narrator s last days with another author narrator A novel in stories stories end with the Spring.Wow Looking back over the books I ve read YTD, all those 4 and 5 stars, I can t really say this is as good as any particular one of them I can say this may be my favorite to date This is one I d actually ask some of you to read T were it possible, this one would get a sky full of stars I liked this onethan Nicholls did in my defense, he s merely a pup, a curmudgeon in training Real curmudgeons are profanely sentimental.


  3. says:

    Once I was at the Caf de los Locos in Toledo Bad writers were in the habit of coming to that caf in quest of characters, and I came now and then among them.And so he did, this Spanish expatriate, writing in English, in New York, because he felt Spaniards wouldn t get it Finished in 1928, it was eight years finding a publisher And when it did, Felipe Alfau gave up writing and worked in a bank The bookWell, there s certainly an audience among my cherished goodreads friends Appearing Once I was at the Caf de los Locos in Toledo Bad writers were in the habit of coming to that caf in quest of characters, and I came now and then among them.And so he did, this Spanish expatriate, writing in English, in New York, because he felt Spaniards wouldn t get it Finished in 1928, it was eight years finding a publisher And when it did, Felipe Alfau gave up writing and worked in a bank The bookWell, there s certainly an audience among my cherished goodreads friends Appearing to be a collection of stories, the characters within nevertheless appear and reappear, in somewhat different forms and identities The author speaks to the reader He explains himself, apologizes faintly A character is playing the Rondeau Capriccioso of Mendelssohn, but we are told in a footnote that the character could not conceivably have played such a piece, performing an inadequate popular dance instead But the author had his way Stuff like that.Alfau demands comparisons, at least every reviewer seems to feel the need he s like Borges, Barthelme and Barth Nabokov, Calvino, Eco Falling into the category of every reviewer , and thus feeling the urge, I d vote for derivative of Sterne and presaging O Brien.As I said, characters appear and reappear Lunarito can be a child, a prostitute, a nun Pepe and Gaston, Carmen and Mignon what a family There is the suggestion of incest, and sex with a 12 year old maid But the author said he could not control his characters, or not completely.A very old looking woman in an apron comes into a kitchen She keeps repeating, if poor Gil should lift his head Like a parrot saying nothing else Thereafter, she is called the old insane woman , but I m not so sure Gil shows up And again.So people are named, and re configured Yet I noticed as if only I was supposed to notice that there was an un named character who appeared only once or twice The fourth man at a table, if you will, where the other three are named Even described once, an older man with rounded glasses He never participates He would seem unnecessary But please don t call me that


  4. says:

    Locos A Comedy of Gestures is a lost gem from the late thirties and was forerunner for the postmodern movement of the 60s onward The novel is a series of interlocking tales wherein characters are redistributed among the manifold Spanish topographies, sometimes for significant contrasts, sometimes for simple mischief.The novel hasin common with the ancient storytelling tradition, narrated in a fable like voice, but Alfau is conscious of the limitations of this form and deploys footnotes Locos A Comedy of Gestures is a lost gem from the late thirties and was forerunner for the postmodern movement of the 60s onward The novel is a series of interlocking tales wherein characters are redistributed among the manifold Spanish topographies, sometimes for significant contrasts, sometimes for simple mischief.The novel hasin common with the ancient storytelling tradition, narrated in a fable like voice, but Alfau is conscious of the limitations of this form and deploys footnotes and authorial corrections to challenge the stiffness of the Great Canonical Novels Their plots are immutable, whereas his book invites a reading in any order, with any number of interpretations The stories are a mixed bunch, but The Necrophil stood out for me a ghoulish tale about an old crone obsessed with death that leaves a haunting resonance


  5. says:

    Puma, you sure can pick em I thoroughly enjoyed this one The characters in revolt against their young author line in the description had me somewhat concerned I could see it getting a little too whimsically meta, like one of those Daffy Duck cartoons where he complains about how the animator is drawing him, and the animator retaliates by drawing Daffyandridiculously Thankfully, there s a lotto it than just metafictive funny business Certainly, there is the element o Puma, you sure can pick em I thoroughly enjoyed this one The characters in revolt against their young author line in the description had me somewhat concerned I could see it getting a little too whimsically meta, like one of those Daffy Duck cartoons where he complains about how the animator is drawing him, and the animator retaliates by drawing Daffyandridiculously Thankfully, there s a lotto it than just metafictive funny business Certainly, there is the element of characters having their own consciousness apart from the author s, appearing and re appearing throughout the interconnected stories, but it stops short of becoming cloying or overwhelming Admittedly, there was a point almost halfway through where I became somewhat frustrated because I just couldn t see where anything was heading Is that character real or imaginary Is this happening in the real world or is it a figment of the author s imagination Are these two characters supposed to be the same person I had been enjoying it up until about halfway, but then it just all seemed so pointless I almost gave up, but I soldiered on, and was immensely rewarded almost immediately Once I made it over that midpoint hump the book opened itself up to me and I started to feel how everything was connected and grok onto Alfau s wavelength From then on, there was no stopping Locos had me under its spell I still feel the need to read it again, because I know on a second reading I ll discover things that I never noticed the first time through I m looking forward to that second reading for right now, though, it s on to Chromos


  6. says:

    Strangely, for a book recommended to me by a man who claims not to like short stories, this is not a novel as its cover blurb claims but a collection of short stories Linked they may be, but cohesive enough to be a novel they are not Nor while I m on the subject of the cover blurb do they anticipate works like Pale Fire and One Hundred Years of Solitude The metafictional element the whimsy of a loss of authorial control as Mary McCarthy writes in the afterword is no great innovati Strangely, for a book recommended to me by a man who claims not to like short stories, this is not a novel as its cover blurb claims but a collection of short stories Linked they may be, but cohesive enough to be a novel they are not Nor while I m on the subject of the cover blurb do they anticipate works like Pale Fire and One Hundred Years of Solitude The metafictional element the whimsy of a loss of authorial control as Mary McCarthy writes in the afterword is no great innovation, and while it is entertaining and, in at least one story A Character , in which a fictional character falls in love with a real woman , moving, it rarely occupies centre stage As McCarthy says If any aspect of the book has aged, it is this whimsicality Maybe that s exaggeration, or maybe I don t care that it has aged for my part, I liked the whimsy, but felt it was unevenly spread across the stories As to One Hundred Years of Solitude, huh In the book s one true magical moment The Necrophil , about a woman who dies for months at a time and is resuscitated Alfau channels Poe, and the resultant fairly traditional gothic tale resembles Marquez not at all That said, I m not complaining For the first half of this book I had a merry old time Old fashioned storytelling with a touch of Pirandello and a bunch of belly laughs it was great But around about The Chinelato I fancied it slackened off in intensity, and by the last two stories, The Necrophil and A Romance of Dogs , I felt sure Alfau was serving up earlier work with familiar character s names inserted to superficially maintain cohesion though I ll admit I m no fan of quizzes or crosswords either, so I no doubt missed some tacked on, I maintain minor revelations Whether there s any real depth here I can t say, but when Alfau s at his best I don t care, because he s so entertaining Nor does the idea of his having been a supporter of Franco from the sidelines in the U.S., not while shedding blood in Spain bother me in the slightest This is about as apolitical as fiction gets, and apart from the last story close to pure invention I think it s great, in places, and some kind of lost classic But to call it a great innovation is a bit of a stretch Oh God, and spare me the Hopscotch comparisons So you can read the stories in any order so what You can read Winesburg, Ohio in any order as well, but no one calls it experimental nor do they call it a novel, for that matter And don t even get me started about how pathetic the structural ruse of Hopscotch is in the first place Forgive me the rant I just get so sick of people praising these books for what seem to me the wrong reasons Locos is fun, period Read it for that reason and I doubt you ll be disappointed


  7. says:

    It takesthan a little something to write about your characters disobeying yourself, the author Well, maybe it takesof that thing today than in 1928, but still Despite that somewhat heavy handed self awareness at the beginning, the authorial footnotes strewn throughout are a less grating touch this text shines in the way it moves It is funny and frenetic and invites you to dothan a little detective work Breezy tune up read for Chromos, which I understand is his masterwork It takesthan a little something to write about your characters disobeying yourself, the author Well, maybe it takesof that thing today than in 1928, but still Despite that somewhat heavy handed self awareness at the beginning, the authorial footnotes strewn throughout are a less grating touch this text shines in the way it moves It is funny and frenetic and invites you to dothan a little detective work Breezy tune up read for Chromos, which I understand is his masterwork Much better than this would be quite good indeed You can safely read the Mary McCarthy afterword on this beforehand She s quite smitten and there s a bit of transfer.3.75 stars


  8. says:

    Poor Felipe Alfau If he had stayed in Spain rather than immigrate to the States he would very likely be considered today one of the most interesting writers among the avant garde artists of the 20th century Locos, a book he apparently wrote in the late 1920s but only published in 1936, and no one paid any attention to it untilthan 50 years later, anticipates trends that can be found in other major 20th century writers In fact, there is no doubt that the structure of Cortazar s Hopscot Poor Felipe Alfau If he had stayed in Spain rather than immigrate to the States he would very likely be considered today one of the most interesting writers among the avant garde artists of the 20th century Locos, a book he apparently wrote in the late 1920s but only published in 1936, and no one paid any attention to it untilthan 50 years later, anticipates trends that can be found in other major 20th century writers In fact, there is no doubt that the structure of Cortazar s Hopscotch, with its chapters that can be read in any order is literally taken from Locos The interruption of the fictive time of the narrative by the real time dimension in which the author writes I need to stop writing because the doorbell rang, he says at some point can be found later also literally in Clarice Lispector, another modernist writer known all over the world as the most important South American female writer, who is only now discovered in this county True, the characters that act independently of their author another feature of Locos can already be found in Luigi Pirandello, who lived before Alfau But think of the fate of all these other writers Cortazar, Lispector, Pirandello all of them celebrated worldwide as some of the greatest writers of the 20th century And Felipe Alfau who has heard of him It is a general misconception that if you write in English, and especially if you are from the States, you havechances to public and universal recognition That may be the case if you write the kind of literature Stephen King writes but if you write anything that attempts to rethink the process of creation, anything truly innovative, forget it The most you can hope for is that some specialist in theory will discover you and write a paper about you, and then one of his students will devote you a thesis no one will ever read From then on everyone will refer to you as an experimental writer, that is, some bizarre specimen stored in a museum from where they will retrieve you from time to time to temporarily dust you off and apply a lotion of theory to your mummified body


  9. says:

    I don t know how I heard about this book, but the author only did this and one other novel and then called it quits on his writing career, probably through lack of readers which is a real shame, as this is a really interesting book Interconnected stories weave in and out of each other and some characters even swap identities and crazy meta fictional devices are to be found carefully placed here and there, as you progress on your merry way You have to concentrate to make sure you follow the mad I don t know how I heard about this book, but the author only did this and one other novel and then called it quits on his writing career, probably through lack of readers which is a real shame, as this is a really interesting book Interconnected stories weave in and out of each other and some characters even swap identities and crazy meta fictional devices are to be found carefully placed here and there, as you progress on your merry way You have to concentrate to make sure you follow the madness closely, but its worthwhile and I can see myself reading it again some day, as apparently its very easy to miss little literary tricks and shenanigans on a first journey through itI read an interview with the author, from when he was old and in a nursing home and he seemed quite cantankerous and bitter and a bit misanthropic, seeming also to be bored by the whole universe, as I think he put it He never got the acclaim he deserved though and so I can see where his rancor comes from and it is sad that this novel never got a wider readership, but maybe one day it will, you never knowthe odd ones are sometimes the best, anyway


  10. says:

    A tale of two cities One is Madrid the other imaginary A tale of two novels written by itinerant, international authors both of whom had Spanish as their first language A tale of two experimental novels One I loved one I did not Can you guess which is which Cortazar published 62 A Model Kit in Spanish in 1968 the edition I read was translated in 1972 Alfau published Locos A Comedy of Gestures in 1936 in English Cortazar had Argentinean parents but was born in Europe then moved back to A tale of two cities One is Madrid the other imaginary A tale of two novels written by itinerant, international authors both of whom had Spanish as their first language A tale of two experimental novels One I loved one I did not Can you guess which is which Cortazar published 62 A Model Kit in Spanish in 1968 the edition I read was translated in 1972 Alfau published Locos A Comedy of Gestures in 1936 in English Cortazar had Argentinean parents but was born in Europe then moved back to Buenos Aires when he was very young and later, back to Europe Alfau was born in Barcelona but moved to the United States when he was 14 Locos was published when he was 34.Call me crazy, but I loved Locos Pun intended It is charming and cruel, tragic and hilarious, ambiguous yet direct, and written with clear, poetic prose The experimental style on display never overwhelmed the narrative Despite the fact that Alfau directly declares the fictive nature of his characters, he made me care about them Unfortunately, I found 62 a Model Kit to be nearly the opposite despite significant similarities Cortazar seems to be peopling an imaginary city with characters and scenarios imagined by the very characters in the story, but unfortunately they never seemed real The characters seemed undeveloped, Cortazar would reveal a quirky trait here or there, but they came across as highly abstract intellectual exercises Where as Alfau acknowledges the characters are abstract, but he made them seem real I found the prose in 62 to be opaque and unwelcoming The sentences zigzagged in ways that didn t complement my brain I felt like I was constantly trying to trace the thoughts of an intellectual squirrel on crystal meth Have you ever done crystal meth It s like being on a mega dose of caffeine but it sucks out all your wit You are basically an idiot who thinks he s not At any rate, every phrase that Cortazar wrote took the sentence in a different direction, and I became tired of trying to figure out what he was trying to say I found the writing tedious I couldn t get the meaning out of it I don t know if I should put some blame on the translation or not, but after 60 pages I threw in the towel I skimmed forward just to pick out sentences here and there and could see that it was essentially the same book throughout This experience was severely disappointing after I quite enjoyed reading Autonauts of the CosmorouteWith Locos, Alfau seems to be following in the footsteps of fellow Spaniard Luigi Pirandello who wrote a play in 1921 entitled Six Characters In Search of an Author I actually performed in this show in college But Alfau goes to a place that blends great humor with the tragedy The story begins roughly with Alfau, playing himself, at a cafe with a friend who becomes a character in the book This cafe is where bad authors go to discover characters for their stories In that cafe, we meet many of the characters who will populate the book Note the irony What follows is a series of interconnected short stories about many of them Most characters reappear throughout and even when they are not featured, a brief mention may act as a dramatic revelation that changes significantly what you read before And further, some of the characters seem to metamorphosize and despite having the same names, serve different roles or have different relationships in subsequent stories The entirety manages to hold together asof a novel than a collection partly thanks to the overlapping characters, partly through the consistent tone and style, and partly because Alfau is always in the background or making appearances as the author He has several charming asides regarding how his characters have gotten away from him, and he can t quite control them Trust me, it just works Some of the stories are quite hilarious Some are devastating and yet often absurd In one case, a man is obsessed with fingerprints because he believes his father invented thescience of fingerprints And didn t receive the recognition he deserves In another scenario, the police are having a convention in Madrid at the same time as a blackout citywide occurs, which leads to a crimewave of everyone mugging just about everyone And the police are so busy with their convention that they are too tired to even arrest anyone It s so ridiculous, Lucy The theme of the absurdity of life is never far from the surface.I devoured Locos I dropped 62 like a hot potato If you want to dip your toe into some literature that is experimental without being alienating, then I highly recommend Locos It s just flat out brilliant, feels modern post in content and style, and it s a book that can be read multiple times Love, love, loved it


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Locos: A Comedy of Gestures (Twentieth Century Classics) The Interconnected Stones That Form Felipe Alfau S Novel LOCOS Take Place In A Madrid As Exotic As The Baghdad Of The ARABIAN NIGHTS And Feature Unforgettable Characters In Revolt Against Their Young Author For Them, He Complains, Reality Is What Fiction Is To Real People They Simply Love It And Make For It Against Ray Almost Heroic Opposition Alfau S Comedy Of Gestures A Mercurial Dreamscape Of The Eccentric, Sometimes Criminal, Habitues Of Toledo S Cafe Of The Crazy Was Written In English And First Published In , Favorably Reviewed For The Nation By Mary McCarthy, As She Recounts Here In Her Afterword, Then Long Neglected