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America's Daughter (Dancing Soul Trilogy, #2) ➻ [Reading] ➽ America's Daughter (Dancing Soul Trilogy, #2) By Maria Nhambu ➰ – Thomashillier.co.uk In America’s Daughter, the second book of the trilogy, the author arrives in the United States in the company of Catherine Murray, an American highschool teacher Her adjustment to a new culture incl In America’s Daughter, the second book of the trilogy, the author arrives in the United States in the company of Catherine Murray, an American highschool teacher Her adjustment to a new culture includes shocking doses of Americanstyle racial discrimination and Nhambu’s discovery that she must learn to be a Black American She graduates from college, thus fulfilling her dream of becoming a teacher, and teaches high school in the inner city She marries, has two children, and establishes herself in the American way of life Then a visit to Africa, and especially to Tanzania, reawakens the drumbeats and dancing that she carries in her soul On her return home, she teaches Swahili and African Studies, performs African dance at schools, and creates Aerobics With Soul®, a fitness workout based on African dance She both finds and creates the family she longed for as a child and connects with her unknown background The first book of the trilogy, Africa’s Child, was released inThe final book of her memoir series—Drum Beats, Heart Beats—reveals of Nhambu’s life as she searches for her father.


10 thoughts on “America's Daughter (Dancing Soul Trilogy, #2)

  1. Re:Views Re:Views says:

    If you enjoy an inspirational memoir, look no further than 'America's Daughter' by Maria Nhambu. She is a truly remarkable woman who travelled from Tanzania to America, where she was adopted by a mother determined to give her all the opportunities she may have missed out on in her homeland. Maria had some deep struggles adjusting to American life and culture so alien to her own. But, she managed to triumph with each challenge, whilst finding herself and her purpose in life, being a teacher both to disadvantaged inner city children, and Swahili and African Dance after rediscovering her love for her birth country.

    Maria Nhambu is a fierce and powerful woman, who has dedicated her life to helping others, whilst being a wife and mother. She really is an inspiration!


  2. Amy Day Amy Day says:

    I love Nhambu and I love her book!!!
    Her life is filled with joy, sadness, growth, kindness and a total fascination with living every moment to its fullest.
    A beautiful woman through and through.


  3. Stephen R. Stephen R. says:

    America’s Daughter is the second book in the Dancing Souls trilogy by Maria Nhambu. It’s an incredibly powerful tale of overcoming adversity that continues to highlight Maria Nhambu’s strengths as a writer.

    The journey at the heart of the story is one that grabs you from the opening page. Nhambu crafts a mesmerizing narrative that is not scared of tackling some seriously big issues in a frank and honest way. Nhambu is clearly a writer who knows how to build a strong emotional arc and she does a brilliant job here once again.

    The book is an emotional rollercoaster that will inspire young women tackling adversity everywhere. Those who enjoyed the first book in the trilogy, Africa’s Child, are sure to get just as much, if not more, from America’s Daughter.


  4. Grady Grady says:

    Entering – and adjusting to – America. Valuable insights for all

    Author Maria Nhambu initiated her three-part autobiography trilogy with AFRICA’S CHILD – an extraordinarily superb book that opened the celebration of her passion for Africa, her birthplace, African culture, and her passion for dance. Now she continues her experiences with AMERICA’S DAUGHTER. Maria has created Aerobics With Soul, a fitness program that marries dance with enhancing movement and health.

    Said before, say again: Memoirs such as this are rare: the sharing of a problematic childhood that eventually blossoms into a celebration of those very beginnings that seemed dire into eventually becoming a path to self acceptance and understanding that would influence and benefit generations. Maria was born in Tanzania, East Africa, raised in an orphanage as a child who did not know her parents, tended by both German and American nuns, and experiencing not only physical and mental abuse, but also racial discrimination. But as she matured into a teenager she grew with her faith and resilience, becoming self reliant and independent, embraced education and her passion for African tribal dance to the point when she won scholarships to follow her destiny to America and university education.

    In this second volume of her autobiography Maria shares her entry into America, as ‘arrives in the United States in the company of Catherine Murray, an American high-school teacher and her adoptive mother. Her adjustment to a new culture includes shocking doses of American-style racial discrimination and Nhambu’s discovery that she must learn to be a Black American. She graduates from college, thus fulfilling her dream of becoming a teacher, and teaches high school in the inner city. She marries, has two children, and establishes herself in the American way of life. Then a visit to Africa, and especially to Tanzania, reawakens the drumbeats and dancing that she carries in her soul. On her return home, she teaches Swahili and African Studies, performs African dance at schools, and creates Aerobics With Soul®, a fitness workout based on African dance. She both finds and creates the family she longed for as a child and connects with her unknown background.’

    Maria’s prose is polished, enhancing even the negative aspects with a sure sense of humor. Her first steps into the US are captured in opening sentences – ‘When we arrived in New York, I wondered if Cathy had played a joke on me. Had we come to America after all? There was no Statue of Liberty anywhere in sight at the airport. I looked everywhere. I guess I expected that as soon as my feet touched American soil, someone representing her and holding the torch of freedom would welcome me. No one had told me to look for her out in the harbor from the plane…’

    Sensitive, insightful, and wonderfully endearing, this is a book with so many important messages that it deserves the attention of all readers – a fine instrument to understanding racial equality and perseverance. Recommended.


  5. Ground Breaking Ground Breaking says:

    Wow! What a life, what a blessing! I am marveling at the remarkable journey of this biracial woman who was born in Tanzania, who got educated by the Roman Catholic nuns over there, and later was adopted and brought to America by a good, kind-hearted American woman who is only about four years older than her in the early 60s. Maria Rose or Mary who is the narrator of her book here, details a life of blessings as well as hardships in her book here. She tells of how she successfully got to make teaching Swahili (an African native language) a part of the curriculum at a school she first worked at here in the USA when she moved here. She also tells of how she danced at a dance club in addition to teaching to make extra money. Maria Rose is hardworking and ambitious and refused to bow down to anyone during her first years here in America. She also includes here the troubles she faced including racism and prejudice. All in all, Maria eventually caught the eye of a Norwegian man who saw her dancing at the nocturnal place she was partially employed at to show off her African dance moves. Soon after, they got married and had two children together.

    This book was truthfully, eye-opening for me. I was a bit ignorant to how Africa is and Maria Rose gave a very positive outlook of the continent it was all so marvelous while I was reading her book here. I think she is a very fortunate woman and a blessed woman at that. All of her experiences, bad or good are written about in here and that is a good thing because then readers who are facing similar issues can look at her example and say, there is hope after all. I especially cried at the moment when she was being denied at a hospital from seeing her dying White American mother because the orderly thought they weren’t blood related because they looked different from each other. This is a story about endurance, about suffering and about turmoil and these elements are what I love about a book. The book’s front cover is very eye-catching and makes it seem like a textbook for a class in college.

    I recommend this book to those who are looking for a memoir/biography to read this holiday season. It is fun, it is brilliant and it can also be depressing and saddening. It was very well-written and I was honestly amazed at her English language writing skills. I think she is one of the best mixed race role models out there that I have come across. Very poignant, very triumphant, and very didactic. This is a book that everyone should include on their to be read lists for the upcoming new year because we could all learn a thing or two from it. Thank you very much Maria Rose Ryan Bergh for showing the amazing side of Africa that people don’t know about.


  6. Monica Reents Monica Reents says:

    It’s difficult to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, but Maria Nhamba shares her life so beautifully in her memoir. Allowing her readers to view what she went through as she came to adjust to life in America. Originally from an African orphanage, she migrated to the States for an education, a chance at a life, but was met with culture shock and racial discrimination. Her determination to become a teacher and to have the life of her dreams kept her striving towards her goals.
    Maria becomes a teacher, a wife, mother, and an accomplished American. I am thrilled she has been able to make a life here and that she has brought her African culture with her.
    I have the greatest respect for Maria and what she has accomplished. This book is written with devotion to the life she has created, intelligence toward the topics of discussion she addresses, and also with love and appreciation for her life.
    I haven’t read her first book, but I will, right before I read the third book. Her story is one you want to follow. She’s amazing and I am so thankful to have read her story.


  7. Red Apple Red Apple says:

    This story narrates the life of the author, Maria Nhambu- an orphaned mixed race Tanzanian woman, adopted by her American teacher, herself barely older than Maria. In the author’s words, this is ‘the story of how a somewhat bewildered, often overwhelmed and confused nineteen-year-old...from East Africa dealt with the challenges of a new life in America...’. The details of Maria’s childhood and her struggles and search for identity are covered in the first book of this trilogy, Africa’s Child.

    Written in an engaging, confessional way that instantly won me over, Maria made me invested in following her story right from the beginning. She includes details of how everyday things in America were so different for her, which really provides a great insight into the perspective of an immigrant, new to the country and culture. She documents significant events in her life, including her marriage to a Norwegian man, the Apartheid they experienced, the family they raised and finally meeting her birth mother.

    A heartfelt and genuine story, told with compassion and humour.


  8. Grady Grady says:

    Entering – and adjusting to – America. Valuable insights for all

    Author Maria Nhambu initiated her three-part autobiography trilogy with AFRICA’S CHILD – an extraordinarily superb book that opened the celebration of her passion for Africa, her birthplace, African culture, and her passion for dance. Now she continues her experiences with AMERICA’S DAUGHTER. Maria has created Aerobics With Soul, a fitness program that marries dance with enhancing movement and health.

    Said before, say again: Memoirs such as this are rare: the sharing of a problematic childhood that eventually blossoms into a celebration of those very beginnings that seemed dire into eventually becoming a path to self acceptance and understanding that would influence and benefit generations. Maria was born in Tanzania, East Africa, raised in an orphanage as a child who did not know her parents, tended by both German and American nuns, and experiencing not only physical and mental abuse, but also racial discrimination. But as she matured into a teenager she grew with her faith and resilience, becoming self reliant and independent, embraced education and her passion for African tribal dance to the point when she won scholarships to follow her destiny to America and university education.

    In this second volume of her autobiography Maria shares her entry into America, as ‘arrives in the United States in the company of Catherine Murray, an American high-school teacher and her adoptive mother. Her adjustment to a new culture includes shocking doses of American-style racial discrimination and Nhambu’s discovery that she must learn to be a Black American. She graduates from college, thus fulfilling her dream of becoming a teacher, and teaches high school in the inner city. She marries, has two children, and establishes herself in the American way of life. Then a visit to Africa, and especially to Tanzania, reawakens the drumbeats and dancing that she carries in her soul. On her return home, she teaches Swahili and African Studies, performs African dance at schools, and creates Aerobics With Soul®, a fitness workout based on African dance. She both finds and creates the family she longed for as a child and connects with her unknown background.’

    Maria’s prose is polished, enhancing even the negative aspects with a sure sense of humor. Her first steps into the US are captured in opening sentences – ‘When we arrived in New York, I wondered if Cathy had played a joke on me. Had we come to America after all? There was no Statue of Liberty anywhere in sight at the airport. I looked everywhere. I guess I expected that as soon as my feet touched American soil, someone representing her and holding the torch of freedom would welcome me. No one had told me to look for her out in the harbor from the plane…’

    Sensitive, insightful, and wonderfully endearing, this is a book with so many important messages that it deserves the attention of all readers – a fine instrument to understanding racial equality and perseverance. Recommended.


  9. Cup and Saucer Cup and Saucer says:

    Maria Nhambu's account of her adjustment to life in America after an awful childhood in an orphanage in Tanzania was compelling and moving. Struggling for acceptance in her new home, she encountered isolation and racial abuse, but she had a great inner strength that cannot be beaten. She graduates college and becomes a teacher, but it is a trip back to her birth country that would change the course of her life.

    'America's Daughter' is an insightful, informative, upsetting, but also uplifting story of the experiences of one immigrant in America, which is sure to resonate with so many people. Despite the difficult themes tackled, the book is full of wisdom, hope, and humour.


  10. Pegboard Pegboard says:

    America's Daughter by Maria Nhambu is inspiring and fascinating as you see America through the eyes of an immigrant. This novel is a continuation of Maria's life, this time after she is adopted and travels to America. The things we take for granted are new and confusing to a poor orphan from Africa. The material things of our country are easy to adjust to, it is the racial prejudice that she struggles with the most. Maria relies on her inner strength Fat Mary and dancing to work out the problems she faces.

    Maria Nhambu opens her heart within the pages of America's Daughter. This is one of the best memoirs I have read. Her strength and resilient attitude is refreshing as she gives one hundred percent though periodically others try tearing her down. I was really intrigued by the perception Maria had during the time of race riots and civil right marches. Her insight on black people losing their ancestral identity just because of their skin color is correct. I loved how Maria brought her story to life and allowed the reader to visualize her years since arriving to our country.


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