The Company of Ghosts Kindle Ì The Company PDF \

The Company of Ghosts ☆ [PDF / Epub] ★ The Company of Ghosts By Lydie Salvayre ✩ – Thomashillier.co.uk When a bailiff turns up, a teenager tries to salvage her mother, their dignity and the TV When a bailiff arrives at a housing project on the edge of Paris to draw up a routine inventory of goods in vi When a bailiff turns up, a teenager tries to salvage her mother, their dignity and the TV When a bailiff arrives at a housing project on the edge of Paris to draw up a routine inventory The Company PDF \ of goods in view of seizure, the reception he receives from Rose Melle and her teenage daughter is than he has bargained for Rose, forever unhinged by the trauma of childhood spent under Nazi occupation, mistakes him for a collaborationist thug and assails him with her alternately tragic and hilarious memories of Vichy France In a narrative that lurches giddily betweenand , Salvayre picks at the sores of recent French history, exposing its continuing authoritarianism The Company of Ghosts won the Prix Novembre in France.


10 thoughts on “The Company of Ghosts

  1. MJ Nicholls MJ Nicholls says:

    This book made me reet proppa melancholy, as they say in the North of England By this, I don t mean the sort of heartsick longing melancholy one finds in a Camera Obscura LP or a French classic, I mean full on Weltschmerz the sort of sadness that takes all week to shake off You roll around on the floor, beating the boards, cursing the naturally evolving world constructed within a naturally evolving series of universes and multiverses, desperate for a better tomorrow for you and your children This book made me reet proppa melancholy, as they say in the North of England By this, I don t mean the sort of heartsick longing melancholy one finds in a Camera Obscura LP or a French classic, I mean full on Weltschmerz the sort of sadness that takes all week to shake off You roll around on the floor, beating the boards, cursing the naturally evolving world constructed within a naturally evolving series of universes and multiverses, desperate for a better tomorrow for you and your children or, if no children, you pray for the opportunity to ever have children with an actual woman This preamble, you may have observed, is a typical MJ ploy to fill the review box with my own ramblings, and thus hook the reader into caring about the book Don t you dare start skipping This novel takes place in a French slum in 1997, when a process server or repo man arrives to make an inventory of the repossessable items in the hovel of a mother and her daughter The mother is tormented by memories of Nazi thugs in her childhood and torments her daughter by eloquently recounting these memories in detail before lapsing into endless tormented screams Meanwhile, the virginal daughter is tormented by romantic longing and her own murderous thoughts Torment is the operative Like Salvayre s The Power of Flies, this novel probes in dark psyches, unflinching in its warts andwarts depiction of how the vilest aspects of our pasts invade our present The novel suffers from a lack of focus and stretching the conceit too far plus confusion as to who is narrating The bonus short story here is a dark Swiftian piece that seems chillingly real


  2. Stephen Stephen says:

    Not many authors are capable of pulling off what Salvayre does in this withering satire Through a verbally euphoric comedy, she forces us to see a familiar tragedy in a new light.The plot follows a simple trajectory Maitre Echinard, a process server, visits the home of Rose and her daughter Louisiane to act upon a summons As he moves from room to room, itemizing the contents of the apartment, he is accosted by Rose, a reclusive madwoman haunted by the ghosts of the Occupation and the death of Not many authors are capable of pulling off what Salvayre does in this withering satire Through a verbally euphoric comedy, she forces us to see a familiar tragedy in a new light.The plot follows a simple trajectory Maitre Echinard, a process server, visits the home of Rose and her daughter Louisiane to act upon a summons As he moves from room to room, itemizing the contents of the apartment, he is accosted by Rose, a reclusive madwoman haunted by the ghosts of the Occupation and the death of her brother Jean at the hands of collaborators in 1943 Her daughter Louisiane, a sexually frustrated teenager, does her best to shield the unflappable, inhuman process server from the onslaught of her mother s memories and stories She fails grandly in this endeavor, often launching into her own monologue, made all thehilarious and poignant by the seeming indifference of her audience.The bare outline of the plot does not do justice to Salvayre s erudite and singular voice Rose and Louisiane are as at home quoting Epictetus and Seneca as they are revealing sexual desires and murderous plots A typical paragraph, this one spoken by Louisiane, runs as follows Sometimes, Monsieur, a spasm of anxiety grips my chest, it really hurts I lie down on my bed I feel as if I m sinking I d like to be somewhere else At six o clock I watch my soap on Channel Two At seven o clock I watch my soap on Channel One I prefer the latter The leading actor has dark hair and green eyes and I like men with dark hair and green eyes I have no other activities It seems there are quite a number of us in this situation Dalkey Archive has appended to the end of the novel Salvayre s brief manual, Some Useful Advice for Apprentice Process Servers, in which Maitre Echinard has a chance to offer his take on the events recounted in the novel proper


  3. Andrew Bryson Andrew Bryson says:

    The Company of Ghosts, by Lydie Salvayre.Translated from the French by Christopher Woodall.Dalkey Archive Press, 2006 Original ditions du Seuil, 1997 184 pages.RIYL Georges Perec, Patrick Modiano, The Handmaid s Tale My mother fell silent a few seconds while the process server inexorably pursued his inventory without realizing that what he was thus making was an inventory of our memories, an entire history, the objects of which bore marks that only we could read p.121 The Company of Ghosts, by Lydie Salvayre.Translated from the French by Christopher Woodall.Dalkey Archive Press, 2006 Original ditions du Seuil, 1997 184 pages.RIYL Georges Perec, Patrick Modiano, The Handmaid s Tale My mother fell silent a few seconds while the process server inexorably pursued his inventory without realizing that what he was thus making was an inventory of our memories, an entire history, the objects of which bore marks that only we could read p.121 There you have, in a nutshell, the scenario of this fascinating short novel by Lydie Salvayre, a French author whose name only recently came to my attention In 1997, the novel s teenage narrator, Louisiane, and her mother, Rose, live together in a poor apartment Rose s memories of the brutal treatment suffered by her own mother and brother under the Vichy state of Phillippe P tain are never far from her mind when she falls behind on rent payments and the bailiff comes calling, she mistakes him for one of P tain s thugs, and directs a torrent of obscenity at the confused lawman Louisiane, meanwhile, is a mess of conflicting feelings thrust prematurely into the responsibilities of adulthood by her mother s mental illness, she first tries to appease the process server with obsequious shows of compliance and plenty of sedatives for Rose , but quickly gives in to the adolescent desire for someone to take her side and hear all the gripes she has about her horrible mother.The plot, as you ll have gathered from this summary, is rather minimal, and the cast of characters is not large It s in the telling of the tale that Salvayre shines constantly shuttling the narrative focus between 1943 and 1997, she lets the past speak through the present in a way that is unforced and powerful As Rose begins to air out her many grievances, Louisiane, who has heard them all before, must both interrupt for the benefit of the process server and complete in an aside to the reader her mother s telling Sometimes, it can be difficult to know whether the words on the page are Rose s direct speech or Louisiane s secondhand report, owing to the lack of quotation marks I suspect this was a deliberate stylistic choice, and I don t fault the author for it while occasionally disorienting, it never grows distracting And each time one of Rose s traumatic recollections or Louisiane s lyrical flights threatens to derail the narrative, Salvayre handily reestablishes us in prosaic reality by reference to the process server inexorably pursuing his grim tour through their apartment The process server, who rarely speaks during the novel, has his say in the book s appendix, which was first published separately I didn t feel that this section added very much to the work, beyond the mildly scandalous revelation that the process server regards Marshal P tain as a great French patriot I hadn t realized that anyone in France subscribed to that particular strain of historical revisionism Then again, I m sure many outside the United States would be shocked to learn that the traitor Robert E Lee is still held in high esteem by a number of my countrymen In closing, I d like to highlight a passage which suggests the moral importance of this work, and its value for readers today In this flashback, Rose is six years old, sitting in the audience at a public ceremony in celebration of motherhood her own mother, an unmarried woman, has not been invited to take part in the festivities, and Rose realizes that her mother s unconventional views have made her a pariah This moving scene is as well written as any passage in the novel, but it resonates with me for a special reason as an American in 2017, I can t help tracing parallels between the Vichy regime and my own country s reactionary conservative movement, lately empowered by the election of President Trump One need only consider the list of local notables onstage during the festival to be struck by the affinity I can see the Mayor, a red white and blue scarf pinned to his massy chest, surrounded by Madame Duvert, the Departmental Delegate to the French Union for the Defense of the Race, Madame V rine, Member of the Regional Association for Christian Marriage, Abbott Vincent, Chairman of the Association for the Improvement of Public Morals, and Monsieur Perrachon, Vice Chairman of the Regional Alliance against Depopulation, a sly and repellent creature who looked rather like this man here, she said with a grimace, pointing at the process server, the same hypocritical face, she added for good measure p.110, emphasis added


  4. Victoria Victoria says:

    I quite enjoyed this book in truth, it isof a novella, being less than 200 pages long It is translated from French, but the translator did a remarkable job of managing to include and even translate the language based humour that would be inherent to French speakers Following the European style, this book does not use quotation marks which, I must admit, made thingsthan a bit confusing at times since between the mothers rants, the story is told in the first person point of view o I quite enjoyed this book in truth, it isof a novella, being less than 200 pages long It is translated from French, but the translator did a remarkable job of managing to include and even translate the language based humour that would be inherent to French speakers Following the European style, this book does not use quotation marks which, I must admit, made thingsthan a bit confusing at times since between the mothers rants, the story is told in the first person point of view of her daughter There were some terrifically lengthy sentences, but these added to the cadence and general aura of insanity Since the action took place primarily in one set of rooms, during the visit of one process server, the book had something of the feel of reading a one act play and I think that this could be successfully and easily transferred to that medium Definitely a unique story, with clever turns of phrasing, this book was a very enjoyable read However, stylistically speaking, I can see how this book would not have a universal appeal


  5. David David says:

    Punishing, though not at the level of some of Bernhard s work Sadly, this never quite took the last step over the line It s powerful, and the subject the papered over sins of Vichy France figures is worthy Probablylike 3.5 stars.Still, I m going to readof Salvayre s work She seems interesting Major props to Dalkey Archive for their French Literature series, which also introduced me to the excellent Jean Philippe Toussaint.


  6. Manon Laroche Manon Laroche says:

    Int ressant d un point de vue stylistique, une mani re d routante mais pertinente d aborder les s vices de la seconde guerre mondiale Une exp rience que je ne regrette pas A noter que malgr l enchev trement des voix et l absence apparente des normes conventionnelles du dialogue, pas une seule fois je n ai perdu le fil


  7. Lance Grabmiller Lance Grabmiller says:

    Originally picked this up used because it was on Dalkey Archives, the second press to publish my favorite author, Carole Maso It was okay, but forgetful The text an alternating paranoid monologues with a kafka esque if I am so allowed finishing section The collision of the tragically personal and the functioning state.


  8. Kaethe Douglas Kaethe Douglas says:

    I just picked it up because I liked the title and the subtitle I never even got around to picking it up and reading a page If someone else reads it and recommends it, I ll put it back on the list Well, since I d not got around to even stating it, I ve added back as TBR


  9. Bookeraj Bookeraj says:

    It is a portrait of generations, of getting old er , and of inevitability of death.


  10. Pierre Sabourin Pierre Sabourin says:

    Le titre exact est La compagnie des spectres Meilleur livre Lire 1997 Style litteraire nouveau de dialogue en prose La France sous Petain.


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