This is How We Change the Ending Epub è How We

This is How We Change the Ending [Read] ➮ This is How We Change the Ending Author Vikki Wakefield – Thomashillier.co.uk I have questions I ve never asked Worries I ve never shared Thoughts that circle and collide and die screaming because they never make it outside my head Stuff like that, if you let it go it s a survi I have questions I ve never asked Worries How We PDF/EPUB Ä I ve never shared Thoughts that circle and collide and die screaming because they never make it outside my head Stuff like that, if you let it go it s a survival riskSixteen year old Nate McKee is doing his best to be invisible He s worried about a lot of things how his dad treats Nance and his twin half brothers the hydro crop in his bedroom his reckless friend, MerrickNate hangs out at the local youth centre and This is PDF/EPUB ² fills his notebooks with things he can t say But when some of his pages are stolen, and his words are graffitied at the centre, Nate realises he has allies He might be able to make a difference, change his life, and claim his future Or can he This is How We Change the Ending is raw and real, funny and heartbreaking a story about what it takes to fight back when you re not a hero.


10 thoughts on “This is How We Change the Ending

  1. Ꮗ€♫◗☿ ❤️ ilikebooksbest.com ❤️ Ꮗ€♫◗☿ ❤️ ilikebooksbest.com ❤️ says:

    Entertaining, hilarious and poignant coming of age story.When I picked up this book, I thought it sounded interesting, but what I got was a terrific surprise I was laughing out loud nearly every other paragraph, despite the dreary circumstances in which the protagonist existed The story was terrific, the banter was entertaining and the protagonists inner commentary was priceless.The main character was a sixteen year old kid named Nate McKee who has a contentious relationship with his father, D Entertaining, hilarious and poignant coming of age story.When I picked up this book, I thought it sounded interesting, but what I got was a terrific surprise I was laughing out loud nearly every other paragraph, despite the dreary circumstances in which the protagonist existed The story was terrific, the banter was entertaining and the protagonists inner commentary was priceless.The main character was a sixteen year old kid named Nate McKee who has a contentious relationship with his father, Dec The Father s name is Declan but everyone calls him Dec, including Nate he doesn t like being called Dad Nate s mother was an addict and left years ago.Dec likes to remind Nate how he stayed when Nate s Mother left Nate is afraid of Dec though he says that Dec has never hit him Dec won t hit a child, but he is not a nice person, especially after too many drinks, and now that Nate is sixteen, he wonders if Dec sees him as an adult and may no longer refrain from hitting him.Dec is now married to Nance who is eight years older than Nate and they have three year old twins, Jake and Otis O has some sort of mental deficiency, they say that Jake took a part of O and that is why he is not quite right The family all says this because Otis has a dent on his chest and Jake has a bump on his Nate has to sleep in the same bedroom as the twins because his old room is being used as a grow room.Dec grows weed to fund his drinking and gambling and doesn t have a real job The flat they live in is government housing and it smells Nate s best friend, Connor Merrick, lives next door and is much tougher than he should be considering he doesn t have the size to back it up He is always starting things with the school bullies and getting Nate into situationsYeah, I m a worrier I worry about pretty much everything, all the time I worry about the big stuff climate change, animal cruelty, the state of politics, boat people, whose finger is on the button, bigness, nothingness, all of it Some nights I lie awake and think about the universe before it was a universe Science says there arethan a hundred billion galaxies out there, and several hundred billion stars in our galaxy alone But how do we know Who counted I get why people believe in God how the fuck did we get here What if just one of those chemical reactions never happened and we never existed, or what if cats evolved opposable thumbs instead of us Some days I feel guilty for worrying about the small stuff schoolwork, no phone credit, no cereal, the holes in my shoes, the stupid sensor light next door that s been left on for two years straight and beams right into our bedroom window, tricking me into thinking the sun is up when it s the middle of the night My circadian rhythms are fuckedNate writes in a journal as a way of getting all the bad thoughts out of his head so he doesn t explode He doesn t show the journal to anyone or plan to do anything with it, he just writes Nate is a very likable kid it is easy to enjoy his thoughts and his story He and Merrick often hang out at the local youth center because they would rather be anywhere but home The story isn t about anything in particular but it is also about everything that this kid goes through and his day to day life His biggest worry is that he is stuck and has no prospects to move anywhere in life, he figures he will end up exactly like Dec The story is engrossing because of the humor and things keep happening, though nothing really changes It is a bit hard to explain, but it was really good and the writing was awesome I recommend this for just about anyone There is no romance, but it is truly funny and I couldn t put it down I actually fell asleep reading it last night.I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book All thoughts opinions are my own.Blog Goodreads FacebookTwitter BookBub


  2. Collin Collin says:

    Longlisted for the 2020 Stella Prize.If you are a reader who refuses to read YA novels, then don t let the moniker put you off with this one This book has a young character named Nate in it, who soon makes you forget all about genre and labels.The novel opens with a prologue The main character Nate is eleven years old He is out in the bush with his father Dec and his friends The little group has a gun and they are planning to shoot, anything that they can When they stumble across a group of Longlisted for the 2020 Stella Prize.If you are a reader who refuses to read YA novels, then don t let the moniker put you off with this one This book has a young character named Nate in it, who soon makes you forget all about genre and labels.The novel opens with a prologue The main character Nate is eleven years old He is out in the bush with his father Dec and his friends The little group has a gun and they are planning to shoot, anything that they can When they stumble across a group of goats Dec gives the gun to Nate and tells him to shoot But Nate doesn t want to This opening prologue is a metaphor for Nate and his life He does not want to end up like his father and his friends His refusing to shoot the goat, is his refusing to follow in the footsteps of his father, but as you will find out, life has stacked the deck against him.Nate, now sixteen, lives in a town called Bairstal There are no jobs, no entertainment, nothing to do apart from go to the youth centre which is on the verge of being shut down Nate has already applied for hundreds of jobs but most of them do not even take the time to send a rejection letter back Nate is highly intelligent, intelligent enough to see that his future looks bleak.Nate lives in a tiny apartment with his father Dec, whose job requirements are drinking at the pub and playing the pokies all day and then come home and argue with his stepmother all night Nate has two stepbrothers, twins, Jake, three years old and turning into Dec before Nate s eyes, and Otis, who may be mentally slow.Nate s father has never actually hit him, but the hint of physical domestic abuse shrouds the narrative I found myself waiting for the page where it happens, and who Dec would hit first.Nate doesn t sleep in his bedroom because his father uses it to grow his hydroponic cannabis, for medicinal purposes of course.Nate hangs out everyday with his best friend Merrick, who pretends to be stupid or slow, but is in fact a straight A student It doesn t pay to be too intelligent in Bairstal, it tends to get you beaten up Nate s English teacher, Mr Reid is quite aware of Nate s intelligence and works away at him furtively trying to help him reach his potential In fact, the relationship between teacher and student is quite a highlight of the book, their conversations and arguments extremely entertaining The note that Nate leaves Mr Reid when he is sent from the room for sneezing gives us an impression of just how intelligent Nate is But his raw intelligence needs to be tempered with education and this is what Mr Reid is attempting to achieve.Nate must escape this life He must escape or be trapped in the same prison his father inhabits His father, just like Sisyphus and his boulder, goes to the pub every day, sinks all his money into the pokies or horses trying to win big, just to lose it all and return the next day to the same task This is the future that Nate must escape The question is how to do it This is a great book 4.5 Stars Kudos go to Nate and another student discussing the poetry of Siegfried Sassoon, the war poet from Pat Barker s Regeneration Trilogy If you get the chance, read some of his poems Especially Suicide in the Trenches


  3. Marianne Marianne says:

    I like facts Facts resolve questions, and a question with an answer is a worry that has lost its power This Is How We Change The Ending is the fifth novel by award winning Australian author Vikki Wakefield At sixteen, Nate McKee is trying to make sense of life He s intelligent and engaged, and he worries about the world He tries to stay under the radar with the bullies at school and the one at home, Dec, his father, while looking out for his three year old twin half brothers I worry that I like facts Facts resolve questions, and a question with an answer is a worry that has lost its power This Is How We Change The Ending is the fifth novel by award winning Australian author Vikki Wakefield At sixteen, Nate McKee is trying to make sense of life He s intelligent and engaged, and he worries about the world He tries to stay under the radar with the bullies at school and the one at home, Dec, his father, while looking out for his three year old twin half brothers I worry that it s too much hard work to be a good person If I was truly good it should be easy Refuge comes in the form of time spent at the Youth, and with his friend Connor Merrick Writing in his notebook keeps him sane I got a few words down Not great ones, but that s not the point Mostly they re just random scenes, fragments of sentences or long letters to nobody Ideas that probably wouldn t make sense to anyone but me They re out of control, so they re not poems they have no music, so they re not lyrics I suppose they re a kind of alternative reality, a possible realitythan a parallel universe Like it could happen to me, instead of a different version of me My notebooks are like my own private well and my words are like stones I drop them in the well so I don t have to carry them around I need the well It keeps me from self destructing If Nate initially strikes the reader as self deprecating, it becomes apparent, when his insightful English teacher sets the class an innovative exercise to have them seriously consider their life goals, that Nate s view of his own future is bleak Perhaps his acknowledgement of the potential obstacles to success make him less a pessimist than a realist, but perhaps he simply doesn t recognise his own capacity Certainly his home life is not conducive to a positive mindset or even simply schoolwork he has to share a bedroom with his brothers one fast becoming a hyperactive clone of their father, the other apparently developmentally delayed because Dec has appropriated his bedroom for an illicit hydroponic weed crop his step mother is sweet but subservient and nutritious meals are beyond her and Dec regularly tries to force Nate to consume beer and use the weed he grows Into the mix are thrown a falling out with his friend, contact from the mother who abandoned him as a child, and the threat of closure for the Youth When his very private words appear as graffiti on the walls, he s not sure whether to be angry, flattered or worried This earnest young man easily captures the reader s heart with his genuine intention to do the right thing Wise words from a vagrant lead him to discover friends he never realised were there.Wakefield s characters are authentic and their dialogue is believable Nate and Merrick communicate in a movie script shorthand and have serious discussions on many issues When Merrick suggests the bin chicken as a target for his slingshot, Nate counters with a well thought out opinion First, ibises are only feral because we built a McDonalds on their wetland they have to adapt to survive Second, don t you see the hypocrisy in sacrificing an ibis s natural environment to feed consumers of French fries and chicken nuggets, stripping it of its dignity and forcing it to resort to eating discarded pickles, and then calling it feral The species faced extinction so you could have your cheeseburger They adapted There s the root of your repulsion It s difficult to limit quotes from this thoughtful character Nance thinks I write things down because I want them to be different It s not only that I write them down because I want to remember exactly how it feels to be me, right now Otherwise my brain plays tricks it changes things, normalises things that aren t normal I don t have the data, but I m willing to bet nostalgia is the brain s way of protecting itself, making sure that you only remember the good stuff By the time we re eighty, our entire memory bank is probably some kind of utopian alternate reality That s why old people only tell you stories about the good old days Wakefield deftly demonstrates the importance, in the development of young adults, of perceptive teachers and youth centres, particularly where parental support is lacking or, worse, negative A character like Nate gives hope for the future This is another brilliant read from a talented author It may be labelled YA, but older adults will also find this a thought provoking and uplifting read


  4. Zitong Ren Zitong Ren says:

    Ok, so I found this to be interesting enough, though I wasn t entirely satisfied with this book, hence the three stars, indicating that while I liked it, I also had some issues with it Now that I ve had some experience reading LoveOzYA contemporary novels, I have found that the writing styles are actually often fairly similar and evoke the same sort, or similar feelings that I have with the prose I can t exactly describe what it is, but it simply might by due to writers having their own sense Ok, so I found this to be interesting enough, though I wasn t entirely satisfied with this book, hence the three stars, indicating that while I liked it, I also had some issues with it Now that I ve had some experience reading LoveOzYA contemporary novels, I have found that the writing styles are actually often fairly similar and evoke the same sort, or similar feelings that I have with the prose I can t exactly describe what it is, but it simply might by due to writers having their own sense of style in their writing here in Australia, that actually, as an Australian feels sort of unique Maybe I m talking complete garbage, which, wouldn t be the first time, but I have found that the prose for some Australian authors, especially contemporary YA writers have this distinct writing style that I haven t really seen outside of these particular authors.Now, onwards onto my actual thoughts for the book Generally, I found the characters to be fairly interesting and well written I probably would have liked there to be a bitcharacter development throughout the book since the plot is extremely loose and it is very character focussed While I liked most of them well enough, there wasn t enough detail to make me really appreciate them The characters do change, but not really enough to have a proper impact on the overall story.Perhaps my largest gripe with this book is that fact that nothing really ends, at all Yes, the book obviously finishes, but none of the plot lines introduced are actually wrapped up I normally don t have a problem with a story not being completely wrapped up with every plot resolved, as that leaves the reader to wonder may occur next In this book however, none of the threads are ended at all and was genuinely surprised when I flipped the page and found it to be finished I don t know what happened with anything and the author spends all of this time building up character relationships and plot points and the book just ends without anything being resolved As I m pretty sure this is a standalone since the ending made it feel that way and there has been no news of a sequel, it left me quite dissatisfied as there was no pay off at all.I felt that there was nothing that was extremely exceptional, either in terms of execution or the way that is was written I know that many people did love this just by looking at the reviews, but unfortunately, I didn t I personally didn t find to be brilliant and maybe there s some sort of deeper message behind it, but if so, it didn t really cut through to me It honestly just read as another standard contemporary that didn t really standout compared to some of the other ones I ve read before.5.5 10


  5. Text Publishing Text Publishing says:

    The following book reviews have been shared by Text Publishing publisher of This is How We Change the EndingWhen I finish a Vikki Wakefield novel I get a tiny ache in my heart because I m already missing her gutsy characters Melina MarchettaThis is How We Change the Ending is Vikki Wakefield s best book and my YA novel of the year It may well be the perfect YA novel Joy LawnI m not sure what we did right to deserve a writer as fine as Wakefield, who captures the bruised vulnerabilityThe following book reviews have been shared by Text Publishing publisher of This is How We Change the EndingWhen I finish a Vikki Wakefield novel I get a tiny ache in my heart because I m already missing her gutsy characters Melina MarchettaThis is How We Change the Ending is Vikki Wakefield s best book and my YA novel of the year It may well be the perfect YA novel Joy LawnI m not sure what we did right to deserve a writer as fine as Wakefield, who captures the bruised vulnerability and tremulous potential of youth with so much honesty and power ReadingsA powerful, affecting story stories like Wakefield s are essential reading InDailyMy YA novel of the year Vikki Wakefield writes brilliantly from inside a teen boy s head, illuminating his thoughts and words with searing understanding and empathy, along with hints of hope AustralianWakefield gets better with each book, and this one BURNS it s so goodAlphaReader


  6. Kim Kim says:

    I don t normally read YA fiction but I ve decided to read the books nominated for the 2020 Stella Prize for Australian women writers and this one is currently on the long list and I hope it makes the short list along with the other novels that I ve loved The young protagonist in this YA is like a witty Holden Caulfied caught in a teenage Wake in Fright Or a Boy Swallows Universe without the magical realism Gritty dysfunctional Aussie family fiction delivered with an excellent sense of humou I don t normally read YA fiction but I ve decided to read the books nominated for the 2020 Stella Prize for Australian women writers and this one is currently on the long list and I hope it makes the short list along with the other novels that I ve loved The young protagonist in this YA is like a witty Holden Caulfied caught in a teenage Wake in Fright Or a Boy Swallows Universe without the magical realism Gritty dysfunctional Aussie family fiction delivered with an excellent sense of humour This is a worthy addition to the 2020 Stella Longlist One I might read again, or listen to on audio, because I enjoyed Nat McKee s musings a great deal


  7. Kelly (Diva Booknerd) Kelly (Diva Booknerd) says:

    For sixteen year old Nathaniel McKee, survival is learning to not to draw attention to yourself, to keep your head down and avoid confrontation Living in their ramshackle government housing apartment is suffocating, Nate is reminded each day of the mother that abandoned him for her substance addiction, leaving him with his alcoholic, abusive father who uses toxic masculinity as a shield Now with his new partner eight years his junior, Nance struggles to care for their two young boys Jake and O For sixteen year old Nathaniel McKee, survival is learning to not to draw attention to yourself, to keep your head down and avoid confrontation Living in their ramshackle government housing apartment is suffocating, Nate is reminded each day of the mother that abandoned him for her substance addiction, leaving him with his alcoholic, abusive father who uses toxic masculinity as a shield Now with his new partner eight years his junior, Nance struggles to care for their two young boys Jake and Otis Otis has developmental difficulties but has responding to cues from Nate of late, angering their father even further.Nate McKee is a pacifist, sympathetic to the environment and sustainability Avoiding confrontation with his father, Nate escapes to Youth Works, the local youth centre where the quietude and solace allow him to gather his thoughts in a series of notebooks, composing poems and anecdotes of the things he is too afraid to say aloud Rowley Park is a low socioeconomic suburb where only the resilient survive and for adolescents like Nate and best friend Merrick, Youth Works provides a haven for those without a safe environment at home.This is How We Change the Ending represents our low socioeconomic communities around Australia, public schooling, government housing and often areas with above average crime rates as residents are unemployed and unable to support their families financially Our elected governments consider them as statistics, they re often our neighbours, our friends or our own families and Nate McKee is a vulnerable young man susceptible to becoming a stereotype.Youth Works is a government funded local initiative for the youth of Rowley Park, providing security and a sense of belonging for those feeling misunderstood, displaced or lonely The youth counsellors are supportive and encourage adolescents to become independent and motivated, including Nate and Merrick, friends and neighbours since childhood Merrick is spontaneous, charismatic and a steadfast friend, although underappreciated Nate is also challenged by English teacher Mister Reid, to think laterally and creatively He instills a sense of confidence and ambition in his students Mister Reid and counsellor Macy are important influences for Nate and through their interactions, he s determined to becomethan a statistic.This is How We Change the Ending is harrowing, traumatic and incredibly optimistic Vikki Wakefield captures the voice of Australia s toughest and most vulnerable families throughout our working class and low socioeconomic suburbs Authentic, compassionate and a remarkable narrative cementing Vikki Wakefield as an exceptional Australian young adult author Sublime reading


  8. charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow) charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow) says:

    The willingness to expose wounds is a sign of privilege Vulnerability is a survival risk, so you don t show it. On my blog CWs domestic abuse, child abuseGalley provided by publisherEvery time I rate a book 3 stars, I come across the same problem how do I review a book I had no particularly strong feelings about Let me start by saying this book was good Vikki Wakefield is an accomplished writer and creates characters you won t be able to help but root for.So why did I not feel it so m The willingness to expose wounds is a sign of privilege Vulnerability is a survival risk, so you don t show it. On my blog CWs domestic abuse, child abuseGalley provided by publisherEvery time I rate a book 3 stars, I come across the same problem how do I review a book I had no particularly strong feelings about Let me start by saying this book was good Vikki Wakefield is an accomplished writer and creates characters you won t be able to help but root for.So why did I not feel it so much Firstly, books about everyday life rarely appeal to me This one, I picked up because years back I read and enjoyed another of hers, Friday Brown But generally, those books rely on their characters to drive the plot and, for all that character driven books can be excellent like Melina Marchetta , all too often they fall short for me And that was the case here For all that I liked the characters, I couldn t muster any love for them.It possibly didn t help that the plot promised by the blurb didn t actually kick in til around two thirds through, and then failed to amount to a whole lot besides In fact, there were a number of plot points that felt unfinished like this, as if they were introduced and then forgotten about But some of that was down to the style of the book and some because they weren t really the focal point of the story.Besides all that, I did enjoy this book, and if a character driven story is up your alley, then this would definitely be one I recommend


  9. Amra Pajalic Amra Pajalic says:

    Wakefield is one of my must read authors and this novel does not disappoint She knows how to capture young people on the fringes of poverty, lost and disillusioned and bring to life their lives and struggles Nate is so real, I see him in my students, in so many young people today His struggle of finding meaning, and his voice in a society that lets him down and keeps throwing hurdles his way is so real and poignant This is a beautiful and heartbreaking book in its depiction of Nate s struggl Wakefield is one of my must read authors and this novel does not disappoint She knows how to capture young people on the fringes of poverty, lost and disillusioned and bring to life their lives and struggles Nate is so real, I see him in my students, in so many young people today His struggle of finding meaning, and his voice in a society that lets him down and keeps throwing hurdles his way is so real and poignant This is a beautiful and heartbreaking book in its depiction of Nate s struggle to rise above his postcode, his parents, and his pessimism


  10. Trisha Trisha says:

    This author keeps producing astonishingly complex tense fiction Very authentic, very raw.


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