Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A Collection of

Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A Collection of Space Futures [Download] ➾ Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A Collection of Space Futures By Ed Finn – Thomashillier.co.uk Why should we go to space To learn about the universe and our place in it To extract resources and conduct commerce To demonstrate national primacy and technological prowess To live and thrive in radi Why should we go to space To learn Escape Velocities: eBook ↠ about the universe and our place in it To extract resources and conduct commerce To demonstrate national primacy and technological prowess To live and thrive in radically different kinds of human communities Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities takes on the challenge of imagining new stories at the intersection of public Visions, Ventures, eBook Ñ and private narratives that use the economic and social history of exploration, as well as current technical and scientific research, to inform scenarios for the future of the new space eraVisions, Ventures, Escape Velocities provides fresh insights into human activity in Low Earth Orbit, journeys to Mars, capturing and mining asteroids, and exploring strange and uncharted exoplanets Its Ventures, Escape Velocities: ePUB ↠ stories and essays imagine human expansion into space as a kind of domestication not in the sense of taming nature but in the sense of creating a space for dwelling, a venue for human life and curiosity to unfurl in all their weirdness and complexityThe collection is free to download in EPUB and MOBI e book formats, as a PDF, and through Apple s ibooks Storetp csiu books vvev.


About the Author: Ed Finn

Ed Finn is Founding Director of the Center Escape Velocities: eBook ↠ for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, where he is also Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in the School of Arts, Media, and Engineering and the Department of English.



10 thoughts on “Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A Collection of Space Futures

  1. Michael Burnam-Fink Michael Burnam-Fink says:

    After Hieroglyph and Everything Change, perhaps the inevitable next destination for the Center for Science and the Imagination is outer space There 2017 offer, Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities is a collection of seven short stories from leading fiction writers, a dozen scholarly essays from the ASU faculty, and a dialog between scifi great Kim Stanley Robinson and Mars scientist Jim Bell.These stories don t shy away from how hard life in space will be That s hard as in hard vacuum, hard ra After Hieroglyph and Everything Change, perhaps the inevitable next destination for the Center for Science and the Imagination is outer space There 2017 offer, Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities is a collection of seven short stories from leading fiction writers, a dozen scholarly essays from the ASU faculty, and a dialog between scifi great Kim Stanley Robinson and Mars scientist Jim Bell.These stories don t shy away from how hard life in space will be That s hard as in hard vacuum, hard radiation, the tyrannies of the Tsiolkovsky equation, and the lag of merely lightspeed communication But yet, space is still the final frontier, and even if the economics of space exploration are not there, and may never be there, we still dream of what we may find and become out in the black The best story, in my opinion, is Vandana Singh s Shikasta , about an encounter between a multicultural exploration team, their AI probe, and an alien life form closer to sentient volcanism than anything we might recognize Madeline Ashby brings a taut small world story about choice and responsibility in Death on Mars , while Karl Schroeder does a little buzzword mashing, but tries to find a way out of the thicket of property rights in The Baker of Mars All the authors bring a good game, and the accompanying essays provide criticism and context with footnotes.This is a great collection of hard science fiction, meshed with science and science policy Fans will enjoy this book, and I could easily see slotting some of the fiction and essays into a course module on space and space related issues And for the price of free, the ebooks are well worth your time Disclosure Notice I am a graduate of ASU, and know many of the contributors as friends or colleagues I was not part of the project, and received no compensation for this review


  2. Peter Tillman Peter Tillman says:

    This free anthology consists of 7 new short stories by well known SF authors, followed by non fiction commentary I m reading the fiction first The best story was 3.5 stars, so no truly outstanding stories here, but 5 good ones Plus a two star, and one I gave up on Vanguard 2.o by Carter Scholz An Uber habitat, one of three in orbit in the near future, gets a visit from the company s trillionaire CEO He has an interesting plan for World Domination A well written story, but not very plaus This free anthology consists of 7 new short stories by well known SF authors, followed by non fiction commentary I m reading the fiction first The best story was 3.5 stars, so no truly outstanding stories here, but 5 good ones Plus a two star, and one I gave up on Vanguard 2.o by Carter Scholz An Uber habitat, one of three in orbit in the near future, gets a visit from the company s trillionaire CEO He has an interesting plan for World Domination A well written story, but not very plausible 3.2 stars Mozart on the Kalahari by Steven Barnes A 17 year old poor boy, in poor health, enters a nationwide science fair contest, hoping to win a trip to space His project has unexpected results Nicely done story, dodgy biology I think 3 stars The Baker of Mars by Karl Schroeder Mars is being developed for settlement by private contractors, individuals who are building the future settlements using telepresence robots But there are legal problems A novel solution is proposed The story doesn t really work as fiction, and I don t understand Schroeder s block chain idea I still kind of liked it, and the following nonfiction piece explains what s going on in plain language If you read them both, the combo gets 3 stars from me Death on Mars by Madeline Ashby One of the first six astronauts on Mars actually, on Phobos has a inoperable brain tumor Her crewmates must deal with an upcoming death A moving story by a new to me author 3.5 stars The Use of Things by Ramez Naam A human astronaut is added to a planned robot mission to an asteroid, over the vehement objections of the project manager Sure enough, the astronaut gets in trouble Robots to the rescue This is like an old Analog filler story 2 stars at best Night Shift by Eileen Gunn It s 2032 A community college student is telemonitoring an AI on a near earth asteroid The AI is directing a plant making nanobots, intended to disassemble the asteroid Complications develop This is a tech heavy story, by one of my favorite authors It s clunky but works pretty well 3 stars Shikasta by Vandana Singh In 2035, an interstellar mission, to an extrasolar planet some 4 light years away, is crowd source financed The story is told by three mission scientists, one Navajo and two rural Indians The world economy is in tatters from climate change, and my WSOD is struggling with how crowd funding could possibly work in such disorder, and how some of the original scientists would still be around when the low budget probe finally gets to Shikasta b, the target planet At 0.1 c, which would be really expensive, that s a 40 year trip, plus 4 years to radio home Full motion video, too It s a novella length story and pretty tough going DNF, failed WSOD, not for me.I scanned some of the non fiction essays Most look pretty turgid I m likely done with the collection


  3. Jared Millet Jared Millet says:

    This is a really interesting collection of stories and essays on the near future of human space exploration, made all the better because you can download it for free The book was published by the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, from a NASA grant As a result, you ve got to wade through about twenty pages of academic acknowledgements before you get to the meat of it A tip for the future save all the thank you s for the end, please.The book is split into se This is a really interesting collection of stories and essays on the near future of human space exploration, made all the better because you can download it for free The book was published by the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, from a NASA grant As a result, you ve got to wade through about twenty pages of academic acknowledgements before you get to the meat of it A tip for the future save all the thank you s for the end, please.The book is split into sections on Low Earth Orbit, Mars Exploration, Asteroids, and Exoplanets In each there are one or two short stories by prominent science fiction authors written specifically for this volume, pared up with nonfiction essays discussing the topics touched on in the stories If you want you can skip the essays and just read the stories, but the fiction and nonfiction authors were clearly in dialog with each other in developing the ideas for the book so it s good to hear both sides of the conversation.At least most of the time There is a whiff of academic pomposity here and there, and having a story I just read explained to me is sometimes like having a joke ruined after the fact However, there is a lot of ground covered here that you don t normally think of in terms of space exploration, unless you ve read Kim Stanley Robinson which the editors clearly have they even interview him for the book Topics go beyond the mere science into the politics, economics, and legal questions that arise when you set foot on another body in the solar system and bring something back.Good brainy stuff Just as science and Hard SF should be


  4. Peter Peter says:

    This is a collection of short science fictiion stories, mostly in the near future and considered hard SF of some degree or another, mixed in with essays from space experts on the real prospects for near future space exploration and issues like ownership of celestial bodies, private public partnership, and technical issues in reaching these far frontiers As such, it s a mixed bag The stories are generally on the optimistic side, and the essays are a little on the downer end that is, realisti This is a collection of short science fictiion stories, mostly in the near future and considered hard SF of some degree or another, mixed in with essays from space experts on the real prospects for near future space exploration and issues like ownership of celestial bodies, private public partnership, and technical issues in reaching these far frontiers As such, it s a mixed bag The stories are generally on the optimistic side, and the essays are a little on the downer end that is, realistic while still being somewhat hopeful I was muchin it for the stories, but the essays were at least interesting.As for the stories themselves, well, they were good, none really stood out as a favorite, none really stood out as a chore to read either, most had interesting ideas it was fun to play around with I will say that a lot of them were, although new, in aclassic mode of science fiction, that is, exploring a particular problem that might come up and exploring how people handle that problem That might be a good thing or a bad thing depending on your tastes although there is at leastthought to characterization than classic SF stories of this type tended to Worth a read, particularly because it s offered free


  5. Alexandr Iscenco Alexandr Iscenco says:

    Quite a good collection of science fiction stories and essays based on the recent scientific developments in space exploration The publication is notable for mixing Sci Fi works with essays by scientists and engineers from universities, NASA, etc This helps one to connect the futures envisioned by the Sci Fi writers with the present reality of exploring the Low Earth Orbit, Mars, asteroids, and exoplanets.


  6. Gregg Gregg says:

    A few sci fi, short stories with very little entertainment value The best thing that I can say about them is that they are based in the near future using technology that is mostly believable The stories are separated by lengthy essays about the stories.


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