!!> Reading ➹ The Revisioners ➱ Author Margaret Wilkerson Sexton – Thomashillier.co.uk


  • Hardcover
  • 288 pages
  • The Revisioners
  • Margaret Wilkerson Sexton
  • 10 September 2019
  • 1640092587

10 thoughts on “The Revisioners

  1. says:

    4.5 Sometimes it s startling to see how much history is so much a part of the present This is a powerful story about how the prejudice of the past has in many ways not dissipated as some may think and as many of us hoped Narrated in multiple time frames by two black women, separated by generations, but connected as family and as is evident at the end by so muchAva in 2017, divorced with a teenaged son, is down and out having lost her job and struggling to make ends meet She decides to 4.5 Sometimes it s startling to see how much history is so much a part of the present This is a powerful story about how the prejudice of the past has in many ways not dissipated as some may think and as many of us hoped Narrated in multiple time frames by two black women, separated by generations, but connected as family and as is evident at the end by so muchAva in 2017, divorced with a teenaged son, is down and out having lost her job and struggling to make ends meet She decides to take a job as caretaker for her privileged white grandmother and she and her son move in with her The narrative quickly switches to Josephine, Ava s great great great grandmother to her life in 1924, having moved from share cropper to land owner and then moves back to her life as a young slave girl in 1855 The narratives alternate, but the movement between them feels seamless So much is covered here relationships between mothers and their children Ava and her mother, Ava and her son, Josephine and her mother and her son You ll find some magical realism, powers of seeing , power to perhaps change things, healing in each of the time frames The evils of the Ku Klux Klan in 1924 and the prejudice that still exists in the present day story is hard to read about, but imperative to be read Throughout I kept wondering how Ava would connect to her great great great grandmother Josephine and I was not disappointed in how Sexton brings this full circle in some stunning moments I never got around to reading Sexton s much praised A Kind of Freedom, but it s on my to read list now I m thinking that it might be as beautifully written as this one.I received an advanced copy of this book from Counterpoint through Edelweiss


  2. says:

    Strong mother, daughter bonds They were once slaves, but a future generation will own their own property In Louisiana, how free is actually free when one is black, even if they do own land of their own Slavery, escaping from slavery and a freedom that is not in only the seems but for these women, in the unseen as well A power passed down to future daughters The lasting effects of slavery and the power and barbarity of the KKK.The novel is clearly written, powerfully written and though it mo Strong mother, daughter bonds They were once slaves, but a future generation will own their own property In Louisiana, how free is actually free when one is black, even if they do own land of their own Slavery, escaping from slavery and a freedom that is not in only the seems but for these women, in the unseen as well A power passed down to future daughters The lasting effects of slavery and the power and barbarity of the KKK.The novel is clearly written, powerfully written and though it moves backwards and forwards in time, I found this effective for this story It is not a story with a clear cut plot, but one where it is the women, their stories that are the main focus How a mother is always present for the daughter, dead or living, never forgotten Although the slavery sections are never easy to read, it is a hopeful novel, one where each generation is aware of the sacrifices of the prior generation It is a novel of love, again love that is seen, but also the love that everyone cannot see I felt this was an authentic novel, no cliches, nor over dramatization Just a solid, good read


  3. says:

    Margaret Wilkerson Sexton bowled me over with her first novel, A KIND OF FREEDOM, a deeply resonant novel about three generations of a Black New Orleans family Her second novel, THE REVISIONERS, also moves through time but over an even greater span from 1855 to 1925 to 2017 At first it seems these periods could not bedifferent for Black women in the South, but even across such vast changes there is much that stays the same This book is, above all, a love letter to the traditions Black Margaret Wilkerson Sexton bowled me over with her first novel, A KIND OF FREEDOM, a deeply resonant novel about three generations of a Black New Orleans family Her second novel, THE REVISIONERS, also moves through time but over an even greater span from 1855 to 1925 to 2017 At first it seems these periods could not bedifferent for Black women in the South, but even across such vast changes there is much that stays the same This book is, above all, a love letter to the traditions Black women pass down, the strength and the power that survive Josephine begins life as a slave, the 1855 sections of the book show us her life as a young girl Josephine s mother is a Revisioner, a spiritual leader to the other slaves, with gifts of sight and knowledge of healing Later, as an old woman, we see Josephine on her own land, able to enjoy all that she has built Until everything threatens to be upended by an unassuming white woman who moves into the land next door Ava is several generations removed from Josephine, but much of Josephine s power remains in their family In an attempt to save money to get a new home for herself and her son, Ava moves in with her aging white grandmother As we move back and forth between their stories, we see Josephine as a wise matriarch and Ava as she begins to come into her understanding of her own inheritance We also see the ways well meaning white women can seem harmless but leave massive destruction and pain in their wakes.THE REVISIONERS doesn t quite rise to the structural and emotional perfection of A KIND OF FREEDOM, but it doesn t seem to have that kind of goal But like Sexton s first novel, it continues to expand the kinds of Black historical and generational fiction in the world She s truly a fantastic talent, a must read


  4. says:

    The Revisioners jumps between three timelines 2017, 1924 and 1855 I was most interested in the present day narrative of Ava, a single bi racial mother who moves with her son to her white grandmother s home Yet the novel became increasingly scattered and I became increasingly confused Slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, doulas, magical realism, a young boy s struggles at school, a grandmother s senility all in 276 pages I think the author is trying to make a connection between the present and the The Revisioners jumps between three timelines 2017, 1924 and 1855 I was most interested in the present day narrative of Ava, a single bi racial mother who moves with her son to her white grandmother s home Yet the novel became increasingly scattered and I became increasingly confused Slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, doulas, magical realism, a young boy s struggles at school, a grandmother s senility all in 276 pages I think the author is trying to make a connection between the present and the past but it got all tangled up I loved Sexton s first novel so my anticipation of this one and its rave reviews leave me deflated


  5. says:

    We have a ghost in here That s how Toni Morrison writes in Beloved about the spiteful specter that haunts an old house in Cincinnati.Her artful invocation of that ghost remains incomparable but also widely relevant to the history of African Americans in this country The spiritual practices that kidnapped Africans carried with them to the United States affirmed the immanent presence of their ancestors The trauma of the Civil War inflamed white Americans interest in spiritualism And Klansm We have a ghost in here That s how Toni Morrison writes in Beloved about the spiteful specter that haunts an old house in Cincinnati.Her artful invocation of that ghost remains incomparable but also widely relevant to the history of African Americans in this country The spiritual practices that kidnapped Africans carried with them to the United States affirmed the immanent presence of their ancestors The trauma of the Civil War inflamed white Americans interest in spiritualism And Klansmen materialized the evil forces of racism as white robed phantoms.We have all kinds of ghosts in here.Margaret Wilkerson Sexton takes on this legacy in her new novel, The Revisioners Spanningthan 160 years, the story begins in present day New Orleans and immediately questions the presumptions of our self satisfied social progress The narrator, Ava, is a biracial single mother trained as a paralegal but currently between jobs Determined to save money, she accepts an invitation from her white grandmother to move into the old woman s mansion and work as a companion To read the rest of this review, go to The Washington Post https www.washingtonpost.com entert


  6. says:

    This story is like a string you come across that is so long you keep following it until you find out what s at the end A story where Black women narrate it and give you feelings of strength and courage Black women raising their sons in the age were rap music is questionable and a time where looking a white man in the eyes is considered a crime You are nurtured throughout this story as the past and the present collide in a powerful way in one families lineage There is limited sympathy towar This story is like a string you come across that is so long you keep following it until you find out what s at the end A story where Black women narrate it and give you feelings of strength and courage Black women raising their sons in the age were rap music is questionable and a time where looking a white man in the eyes is considered a crime You are nurtured throughout this story as the past and the present collide in a powerful way in one families lineage There is limited sympathy towards white women as they share their pain, but it is unmatched to every Black woman in this story It has no real power in this story but does show how they seek comfort from Black women I could prepare my bath with white women s tears I ll admit I became naive towards the ending of the book I thought this would be a time where maybe our voice would not be shattered by the mistakes of the white man BUT I was wrong The end hurt me in a way that I was oddly not prepared for There is so much to take away from this story and highly recommend you read it On that note, I will leave you with this quote from the book, And my momma said you could tell a lot about a man by his shoes, but if she d come visit me, I d tell her that s not true My mama makes a lot of bad decisions in her life, and in a lot of ways I had to raise her, but this time I would tell her, that s not true So in case there s a man in her life she needs to judge, she ll know to find another way


  7. says:

    This multigenerational story focuses on Ava in 2017 and Josephine in 1924 and as a child in 1855 Both black women are mothers seeking freedom for their families while navigating white privilege and entrenched racism before the Civil War, after Reconstruction and even today Ava and Josephine survive a society seeking to deny them dignity The author helps their efforts with a little magical realism every once in a while Wilkerson Sexton creates wonderful characters that will stick with you This multigenerational story focuses on Ava in 2017 and Josephine in 1924 and as a child in 1855 Both black women are mothers seeking freedom for their families while navigating white privilege and entrenched racism before the Civil War, after Reconstruction and even today Ava and Josephine survive a society seeking to deny them dignity The author helps their efforts with a little magical realism every once in a while Wilkerson Sexton creates wonderful characters that will stick with you Charlotte, Josephine s friendly white neighbor, is married to an abusive Ku Klux Klan member Ava acts as her white grandmother s caregiver, but the woman s dementia shuttles her back to a previous era that claimed white superiority and thus, behaves abominably towards Ava on occasion Both situations prove difficult and possibly dangerous.However, this is less of a plot driven novel than a recounting of two strong women building on the legacies of their female ancestors Recommend


  8. says:

    This riveting novel, The Revisioners was told in two crucial point of views and in three pivoting time lines that feature two African American women Ava and Josephine, who are connected by blood, and whose stories span over 160 years from the 1850 s through 1920 s, and finally in current day New Orleans, 2017 This is a story of a family that for generations had been penetrated by deeply ingrained racism This is a timely story that the readers will connect with and the reason why our black co This riveting novel, The Revisioners was told in two crucial point of views and in three pivoting time lines that feature two African American women Ava and Josephine, who are connected by blood, and whose stories span over 160 years from the 1850 s through 1920 s, and finally in current day New Orleans, 2017 This is a story of a family that for generations had been penetrated by deeply ingrained racism This is a timely story that the readers will connect with and the reason why our black communities are still struggling for equality and human rights The story begins in current time with Ava as a biracial woman who moves in to her very wealthy white great grandmother s home to work as her companion the story wants me to believe just as Ava, that social progress and racism has been overcome in this family despite warnings from her own family My favorite was Josephine s story, which began as an enslaved child in the mid 1800 s Her story continues as she becomes a successful landowner in the 1920 s Throughout the story, there were sprinkling of prayers, scriptures and church hymns that add to the setting of life in the south during those times The Revisioners was a sweeping and powerful story of how racial tensions spans across generation through the stories of women, their familial relationships, and the ingrained prejudice that seeps through not only in this family but the community that goes beyond skin deep I highly recommend this book Margaret Wilkerson Sexton is a brilliant writer that probes into the stories of the privileged to the marginalized, and the fragility of the racial divide that is still palpable in our current times A timely and relevant story that is a must read


  9. says:

    Margaret Wilkerson Sexton s The Revisioners taps into the gifts, glories, and gospels of three generations of Black women who, in the face of slavery and its vestiges, must reckon with matters of faith and trust The book shifts between chapters told by Ava, an out of work single mother living in 2017 New Orleans, and her great grandmother Josephine both from her time as a widowed self made farmer in 1925 and in her youth on the plantation in 1855 Then there is Gladys, Ava s mother and Joseph Margaret Wilkerson Sexton s The Revisioners taps into the gifts, glories, and gospels of three generations of Black women who, in the face of slavery and its vestiges, must reckon with matters of faith and trust The book shifts between chapters told by Ava, an out of work single mother living in 2017 New Orleans, and her great grandmother Josephine both from her time as a widowed self made farmer in 1925 and in her youth on the plantation in 1855 Then there is Gladys, Ava s mother and Josephine s daughter, who albeit chapter less, affirms her place as a doula and the spiritual thread that connects them all Without her, Ava might not have taken heed to the power within herself, nor the dangerous harbingers she overlooked after relocating with her son to the home of her seemingly harmless white grandmother, Martha, in exchange for payment Just as Gladys feared, Ava becomes worn down by Martha s protean mood swings, which give way to menacing outbursts that evoke pangs of another time, a time of the plantation, and one that still pangs the story s matriarch in her old age We see this in 1925 with Josephine, a miracle child reborn of powers inherited from her mother, a Revisioner a Black spiritual healer and a sage among the other slaves she envisioned to freedom when a KKK affiliated white woman arrives at her door pining for camaraderie, one that ends in blood.For me, this heart gripping story laid bare the many truths I d already known of white entitlement, rage, and dishonesty, but also offered a larger notion of what it must mean to carry those burdens, of inheriting powers beyond our belief Despite my reservations of the amount of wrongdoing I felt went spared in this book Martha s bigotry coddled by her age, a mother having to pander to the very people who murdered her child I found catharsis in the true might of ancestral spirituality that was passed down to deliver us from those sorrows Written in the vein of Jesmyn Ward s Sing, Unburied, Sing, Sexton is a gifted storyteller who not only lends credence to the emotional endurance of her people but to the boundless power Black women can summon to survive If you liked my review, feel free to follow me parisperusing on Instagram.


  10. says:

    This novel moved between three timelines mid 1800 s, early 1900 s and current time Each story line was compelling in its own way and the pacing was done well My issue with this book was with the characterizations and the sometimes, the writing I didn t really like Josephine the elder or her descendant, Ava Josephine was often harsh and seemed to lack empathy for some members of her family The same could be said of Ava with her mother Ava s description of her relationship with her mother p This novel moved between three timelines mid 1800 s, early 1900 s and current time Each story line was compelling in its own way and the pacing was done well My issue with this book was with the characterizations and the sometimes, the writing I didn t really like Josephine the elder or her descendant, Ava Josephine was often harsh and seemed to lack empathy for some members of her family The same could be said of Ava with her mother Ava s description of her relationship with her mother prior to the beginning of the book didn t make any sense from the way the author portrayed her mother There were times when I had to keep re reading lines to figure out what the author was saying and this wasn t done in appreciation of the writing This happened less and less as the novel went on and as I got used to the style, but it was irritating at first At the end, I am glad I read the book but not sure that I would try another book by this author Not till I see from reviews that she s become a stronger writer than she currently is


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The RevisionersIn , Josephine Is The Proud Owner Of A Thriving Farm As A Child, She Channeled Otherworldly Power To Free Herself From Slavery Now, Her New Neighbor, A White Woman Named Charlotte, Seeks Her Company, And An Uneasy Friendship Grows Between Them But Charlotte Has Also Sought Solace In The Ku Klux Klan, A Relationship That Jeopardizes Josephine S FamilyNearly One Hundred Years Later, Josephine S Descendant, Ava, Is A Single Mother Who Has Just Lost Her Job She Moves In With Her White Grandmother Martha, A Wealthy But Lonely Woman Who Pays Her Grandchild To Be Her Companion But Martha S Behavior Soon Becomes Erratic, Then Even Threatening, And Ava Must Escape Before Her Story And Josephine S ConvergeThe Revisioners Explores The Depths Of Women S Relationships Powerful Women And Marginalized Women, Healers And Survivors It Is A Novel About The Bonds Between A Mother And A Child, The Dangers That Upend Those Bonds At Its Core, The Revisioners Ponders Generational Legacies, The Endurance Of Hope, And The Undying Promise Of Freedom


About the Author: Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Revisioners book, this is one of the most wanted Margaret Wilkerson Sexton author readers around the world.