Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case PDF/EPUB Ï Curtain:


Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case [BOOKS] ✪ Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case By Agatha Christie – Thomashillier.co.uk Arthritic and immobilized, Poirot calls on his old friend Captain Hastings to join him at Styles to be the eyes and ears that will feed observations to Poirot's still razor sharp mind Though aware of Arthritic and immobilized, Poirot calls on his old friend Captain Hastings to join him at Styles to be the eyes and ears that will feed observations to Poirot's still razor sharp mind Curtain: Poirot’s Kindle - Though aware of the criminal's identity, Poirot will not reveal it to the frustrated Hastings, and dubs the nameless personage 'X' Already responsible for several murders, X, Poirot warns, is ready to strike again, and the partners must work swiftly to prevent imminent murderPoirot’s final case, a mystery which brings him and Hastings back to Styles where they first solved a crime together The story was both anticipated and dreaded by Agatha Christie fans worldwide, many of whom still refuse to read it, as it is known to contain Poirot’s deathAgatha Christie wrote it during World War II, as a gift for her daughter should she not survive the bombings, and it was kept in a safe for over thirty years It was agreed among the family that Curtain would be published finally inby Collins, her longstanding publishers, and that Sleeping Murder the Marple story written during the war for her husband, Max would followThe reception of Poirot’s death was international, even earning him an obituary in The New York Times; he is still the only fictional character to have received such an honour The first actor to take on the role of portraying Poirot in his final hours was David Suchet, as the final episode of the series Agatha Christie’s Poirot for which he’d been playing the role for twentyfive years The episode was adapted in.

    Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case PDF/EPUB Ï Curtain: both anticipated and dreaded by Agatha Christie fans worldwide, many of whom still refuse to read it, as it is known to contain Poirot’s deathAgatha Christie wrote it during World War II, as a gift for her daughter should she not survive the bombings, and it was kept in a safe for over thirty years It was agreed among the family that Curtain would be published finally inby Collins, her longstanding publishers, and that Sleeping Murder the Marple story written during the war for her husband, Max would followThe reception of Poirot’s death was international, even earning him an obituary in The New York Times; he is still the only fictional character to have received such an honour The first actor to take on the role of portraying Poirot in his final hours was David Suchet, as the final episode of the series Agatha Christie’s Poirot for which he’d been playing the role for twentyfive years The episode was adapted in."/>
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 215 pages
  • Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case
  • Agatha Christie
  • English
  • 08 January 2019
  • 9780425173749

About the Author: Agatha Christie

Mary Westmacott, and was occasionally published under the name.



10 thoughts on “Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case

  1. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Curtain (Hercule Poirot Mysteries #42), Written about 1940, published 1975, Agatha Christie (1891 – 1976)

    Abstract: The crime-fighting careers of Hercule Poirot and Captain Hastings have come full circle they are back once again in the rambling country house in which they solved their first murder together. Both Poirot and Great Styles have seen better days but, despite being crippled with arthritis, there is nothing wrong with the great detective and his “little gray cells.” However, when Poirot brands one of the seemingly harmless guests a five-time murderer, some people have their doubts. But Poirot alone knows he must prevent a sixth murder before the curtain falls. . . .

    Characters: Hercule Poirot, John Franklin, Barbara Franklin, Judith Hastings, Stephen Norton.

    عنوانها: آخرین پرونده پوآرو؛ پرده؛ پوآرو از صحنه خارج میشود؛ مرگ به سبک پوارو؛ غروب استایلز؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1998 میلادی و سال 2000 میلادی

    عنوان: پرده، نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: رویا سعیدی، نشر: تهران، کتابهای کارآگاه وابسته به انتشارات هرمس، 1379، در 265ص، شابک 9789647100465؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی - سده 20م

    عنوان: آخرین پرونده پوآرو، نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: ثریا قیصری، نش: تهران، راستی نو، 1377، در 256ص.، شابک 9645611156؛

    عنوان: پوآرو از صحنه خارج میشود، نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم بیژن خرسند، نشر تهران، انتشارات کتاب، 1360، در 216ص، شابک: ندارد

    عنوان: مرگ به سبک پوارو، نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: سید رضا حسینی، نشر تهران، ل‍ک‌ل‍ک، 1372، در 256ص، شابک: ندارد

    عنوان: غروب استایلز، نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ ترجمه: بهرام افراسیابی، نشر تهران، راد، 1372، در 278ص، مصور، شابک ندارد

    چکیده داستان: پوارو در نامه ای از دوست و همراه همیشگی خویش «هستینگز»، درخواست میکند، که در عمارت «استایلز»، به او ملحق شود، عمارتیکه حالا به عنوان یک هتل، از آن استفاده میشود، پوارو که بیمار و رنجور است، روی صندلی چرخدار مینشیند، و با قتلهایی مواجه است که طی آن، قاتلین همیشه به گناه خودشان اعتراف می‌کنند، و شخصی که مسبب اصلی قتلهاست، به شیوه ای مرموز و شیطانی، نقش یک عامل را در جنایتها ایفا میکند، ولی او هرگز به دام نیفتاده است و ...؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Curtain (Hercule Poirot #39), Agatha Christie
    Curtain (Hercule Poirot #39), Written about 1940, published 1975, Agatha Christie (1891 – 1976)
    Characters: Hercule Poirot, John Franklin, Barbara Franklin, Judith Hastings, Stephen Norton.
    Abstract: The crime-fighting careers of Hercule Poirot and Captain Hastings have come full circle they are back once again in the rambling country house in which they solved their first murder together. Both Poirot and Great Styles have seen better days but, despite being crippled with arthritis, there is nothing wrong with the great detective and his “little gray cells.” However, when Poirot brands one of the seemingly harmless guests a five-time murderer, some people have their doubts. But Poirot alone knows he must prevent a sixth murder before the curtain falls. . . .
    عنوانها: آخرین پرونده پوآرو / پرده / پوآرو از صحنه خارج میشود / مرگ به سبک پوارو / غروب استایلز ؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1998 میلادی و تاریخ خوانش این نسخه سال 2000 میلادی
    این کتاب با عنوان فارسی: «آخرین پرونده ی پوارو» با برگردان: بانو «ثریا قیصری»، و با عنوان: «پوارو از صحنه خارج میشود» با برگردان آقای «بیژن خرسند»، و نیز، با عنوان: «پرده»، با برگردان بانو «رویا سعیدی»؛ و با عنوان: غروب استایلز؛ با ترجمه: آقای بهرام افراسیانی؛ در تهران، نشر راد، سال 1372، در 278 ص؛ و در سال 1392 در تهران، مهرفام، در 325 ص، با شابک: 9789649915357؛ نیز، به زیور چاپ آراسته شده است
    عنوان: پرده، مترجم: رویا سعیدی، نشر: تهران، کتابهای کارآگاه وابسته به انتشارات هرمس، 1379، در 265 ص.، ، شابک: 9789647100465
    عنوان: آخرین پرونده پوآرو، مترجم: ثریا قیصری، نشر: تهران، راستی نو، 1377، در 256 ص.، شابک: 9645611156
    عنوان: پوآرو از صحنه خارج میشود، مترجم: بیژن خرسند، نشر: تهران، انتشارات کتاب، 1360، در 216 ص.، ، شابک: ندارد
    عنوان: مرگ به سبک پوارو، مترجم: سید رضا حسینی ، نشر: تهران، ل‍ک‌ل‍ک، 1372، در 256 ص.، ، شابک: ندارد
    عنوان: غروب استایلز، ترجمه: بهرام افراسیابی ، نشر: تهران، راد، 1372، در 278 ص.، مصور، شابک ندارد
    خلاصه داستان: پوارو در نامه ای از دوست و همراه همیشگی خویش «هستینگز» درخواست میکند که در عمارت «استایلز» به او بپیوندد، عمارتی که حالا به عنوان یک هتل، از آن استفاده میشود، پوارو که بیمار و رنجور است، روی صندلی چرخدار مینشیند، و با قتلهایی مواجه است که طی آن، قاتلین همیشه به گناه خودشان اعتراف می‌کنند، و شخصی که مسبب اصلی قتلها بوده به شیوه ای مرموز و شیطانی، نقش یک عامل را در جنایتها ایفا میکند، ولی او هرگز به دام نیفتاده است و ... ا. شربیانی

  3. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Rating: The Full Five

    When this novel came out in 1975, my older sister was a bookshop owner and gave me and our mother a copy to savor. None of the three of us were particular Christie nuts. My sister felt that Dame Ags played gawd with the clues a bit too much...my mother found Poirot insufferably smug. I read the book without discrimination or comprehension, and moved on to other things I liked better. I believe that was the year I read Stand on Zanzibar, but am not positive.

    Now that I'm the age my mother was when she read the book, I see something more interesting to old-man me than ever would have occurred to teenaged me. This ending for Poirot's career was written during the Blitz, a time when anyone at all could die without warning, because Dame Agatha thought her fans deserved an ending to their character's life that would give completeness and finality to an important part of a series-book reader's life. How very thoughtful that is. How aware Dame Agatha was of her creation's place in the emotional lives of her fans.

    And to her most ardent partisans, those who bristle at the probable cause of the evident diminution of her writing prowess due to dementia, I can only say: Read this book, and then read the last book she wrote, Elephants Can Remember, which I've reviewed unfavorably elsewhere. The difference is stark and deeply saddening.

    The 2013 television adaptation is stellar and gets, on its own merits, a five-star review. David Suchet so completely became Poirot that I can only hope someone somewhere possesses both the power and the will to derail the 2017 adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express perpetrated by Kenneth Branagh for no good or even comprehensible reason before its scheduled release on 10 November 2017. Why not choose 11/11/17 at 11:11am? Armistice Day might, in the eyes of Kalliope, excuse or at least obscure Branagh's hubris in making this unneeded and unwelcome film.

    Not that I have a strong opinion, you understand. I merely comment upon the passing scene, comme d'habitude.

  4. Evgeny Evgeny says:

    Poirot's last novel and last case. Things came full circle and Captain Hastings went to Styles where he had seen a Poirot's investigation for the first time. Only now Poirot was crippled and lost use of his legs, but the gray cells... the gray cells still worked. Hastings had no clue that Poirot was about to match his wits with a genius serial killer who could never be accused of his crimes by any court, or even suspected - sort of like Professor Moriarty if you will, but their methods were very different.
    Moriarty

    Let me start with the things I did not like and even hated sometimes. Hastings' IQ lowered since the first book and he was not exactly Einstein to begin with. Poirot's constant gloating about the fact got on my nerves - after all, Hastings could not help being stupid and he had to be pitied, not constantly being reminded about.
    Forrest
    Personally, oh my God mercifully he was not present in the large part of the series, especially in the later books and I forgot about his low mental abilities. Here I was for a rude reawakening to the fact.

    Having said that, his daughter was present in the action. I regret to say she took her mental abilities from her father and I also suspect she was dropped on her head repeatedly when she was a toddler. She was shown as a capable biologist, but in ordinary situations she made her father look like a genius. I am not talking here about the eccentricity and lack of attention of some talented people, I am talking about stupidity (in other words, she was mentally challenged to put in into modern terms). It did not help any that she behaved like a young rebellious teen - and I have it on good authority that not all of them are that bad.
    Teen

    The villain was painfully obvious from relatively early in the book for any reader who satisfies the following two conditions. First, he or she (or it) needs to have an IQ slightly higher than Captain Hastings (and much higher than his daughter). Second, a will to exercise the aforementioned gray cells - just a little, mind you. So do not expect usual crazily complicated plot which is a trademark by the Queen of Mystery.

    I did not like the way she treated Poirot. I totally understand by the time of writing she was tired of the character and publishers and readers still demanded more of his adventures. Sure the guy had an ego of the size of a modern aircraft carrier,
    Carrier
    but I like his conviction that murder is wrong - and he always kept it and he never let his ego get in the way of it.

    Lastly this book was written before the previous one of the series and it feels less modern than the letter - this was a little jarring. But here I am nitpicking.

    So from what I wrote about one would think that the rating is 3 stars, but I gave 4. There are three reasons. My general respect for the whole series and the character of Poirot. The villain who was very good and interesting (and very villainous). Also after all I said it is still a great farewell to the second greatest private detective of the literature.

  5. mark monday mark monday says:

    You Chose Your Own Adventure!

    You are the killer: you kill yourself. You deserve it. Or do you? Are you the hero or the villain? But what does it matter; in the end, death comes to us all. Your adventure is over.

    If you decide to reject your notorious life and start anew, choose
    http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

  6. David Schaafsma David Schaafsma says:

    Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case!

    “Nothing is so sad, in my opinion, as the devastation wrought by age”—Hastings, on Poirot

    I’m done, whew, having read all of 38 Christie Poirot novels (and a couple short story collections) in order of publication, over the past 2-3 years. I’ll listen again to And Then There Were None and will not read Christie again for awhile, I am sure.

    Christie, fearing for her life during WWII, wrote the last Poirot and Marple books in the early forties, and sealed them in a vault until just a couple years before her death, intending them to be the last novels, the last word, for her respective detective heroes. She much preferred Marple to Poirot, who in the sixties she had truly grown tired of, calling him an egocentric creep. However, unlike Conan Doyle, Christie resisted the temptation to kill her detective off while he was still popular. She saw herself as an entertainer whose job was to produce what the public liked, and the public liked Poirot.

    Christie made a mistake in 1920 in having her Belgian detective already retired, afterwards writing him as a main character for fifty more years!! So are we to surmise he retired at 40? 21?! Poirot returns to Styles in this one, where the first Poirot novel is set, written in 1920 when Christie was 30. Curtain was published in 1975, less than a year before she died, at 85, in 1976!! 55 years of writing Poirot!! Poor (and very rich) woman! Good for her and us, though, on the whole, as she emerged as the best selling author of all time.

    And no matter how old he is, we need our main man with the marvelous moustaches to be in full possession of his “little gray cells” right up until the end. Is this realistic? Well, either way he seems undiminished in speech and cognition without fail. The erosion of memory is a theme in this and many of the last books for the eighty-something Christie, but not for Poirot! He solves the crime, as always, though it is complicated and interesting how it happens and how it is revealed; I can’t exactly say how without spoilers.

    This book also features the early Poirot-books Captain Hastings, a buffoon who again tells the story, clueless every step of the way.

    Keyholes figure in, amusingly.

    Since Curtain is the title, Christie frames her last book in terms of her major love, theater, and performance, and disguises. We even discover Poirot has been disguising himself for years, in a way. And Othello’s Iago figures in, so Shakespeare is her darling right to the end for inspiration.

    This may not be one of the very best of his books, but it is clever, with better writing than we have seen for many years from Christie (because she wrote it in the forties!). She also doesn’t bother to pull it from the vault to revise it for continuity, grr. For instance, the supposedly older Poirot here has more problems with colloquial English than he has had in decades, consistent with a forties Poirot, not a seventies Poirot. But overall, it was good to bring back Hastings, and to end as we began, in Styles. And the killer—a serial killer—and how he kills, is original and interesting. It is a very good book in the Christie canon and because of the nature of the killer and because of the series of Big Surprises in the plot, I am going to bump it from 4.5 to 5 stars.

    A SPOILER ALERT about something very sweet that had never before happened, hidden in this link to the historically stuffy The New York Times, 6 August 1975, following the publication of Curtain.:

    http://www.nytimes.com/1975/08/06/arc...

    My five star Poirots:

    The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
    Peril at End House
    Murder on the Orient Express
    Curtain

    My four star Poirots:

    Lord Edgeware Dies
    Three Act Tragedy
    The A.B.C. Murders
    Murder in Mesopotamia
    Cards on the Table
    Death on the Nile
    Sad Cypress
    Evil Under the Sun
    Five Little Pig
    The Hollow
    After the Funeral

  7. Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ says:

    Agatha Christie's swan song for her most famous character, Hercule Poirot, fittingly returns him and and his friend Arthur Hastings to the setting of her very first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. Aside from the fact that it's Poirot's final case, a rather unusual twist and the recurring Othello theme make this one of Christie's more memorable works, if rather melancholy.

    It was interesting to find out that Christie originally wrote this novel during World War II, possibly fearing that she might not survive the war and wanting to give Poirot an appropriate send-off. Then she put Curtain in a bank vault for over 30 years, finally publishing it in 1975. It was her last published book before she died.

    Au revoir, Agatha and Hercule.

  8. Poonam Poonam says:

    For a murderer, my friend, is more conceited than any creature on this earth. A murderer is always more clever than anyone else- no one will ever suspect him or her- the police will be utterly baffled

    The above quote is a perfect way to describe this mystery.

    I have been wanting to read this for some time now and what better day than Christie's birthday.

    I have now read numerous mysteries by Christie but there is no pattern (apart from a cozy setting)
    Each and every mystery, murder suspects, the end is unique and it baffles me as generally when you read many books by one author some things do become predictable.

    The only thing I have learnt after reading Agatha Christie books is that expect the unexpected and still you won't guess how shocking the unexpected can be!

    This is the last in the series of Poirot mysteries and I would recommend to read the first of this series- The Mysterious Affair at Styles before this as both the mysteries take place at Styles and there is a spoiler to the first book in this story.
    And suddenly from nowhere, a vague feeling of uneasiness and disquiet assailed me. It was not safe- it was not right- to plan happiness here. There was something malignant about the air of Styles

    Poirot and Hastings come together in this last case together to catch X who is clever and sadistic as any murderer can be. There is a mix of lovely characters who make you trust them but doubt them at the same time.
    Everyone is a potential murderer- in everyone there arises from time to time the wish to kill- though not the will to kill

    The ending is soo ingenious but soo complicated, I just had to sit back and digest it all


    There is no way I could have guessed this. Did you?

  9. Laurel Young Laurel Young says:

    I admit it, I teared up at the end; I don't ever want there to be a final Poirot novel. However, two things comforted me: one is that this was not actually the last novel Dame Agatha wrote about Poirot, not by a long shot. Since Elephants Can Remember is largely regarded as a weak later effort, I think of Hallowe'en Party as the last excellent novel written about Poirot. Curtain was written somewhere around WWII most likely, and put away to be released decades later as Agatha neared the end of her long career. So it is always possible to read the novels in chronological order and pretend that Poirot is back for all his many post-WWII cases, rather like Sherlock Holmes' return from The Final Problem.

    But the biggest comfort is that this truly excellent novel could not have been written without (view spoiler)[ killing off Poirot--it is in some ways the ultimate twist from the author famous for brilliant, unexpected twists. Agatha often expressed the idea that ANYONE is capable of murder in the right circumstances, and her novels show that the last person the reader expects to have done it, could have done it--the narrator, a child, a supposedly dead character, etc! In Curtain, Agatha hits us with the biggest shocker of them all: even her Great Detective is not immune. Poirot can and does commit murder, and even mon ami Hastings makes a (typically blundering!) attempt...and both are completely in character whilst doing so. No doubt Agatha wanted to write the detective author's White Whale: the perfect crime. And who could pull off the perfect crime except Poirot himself?? (hide spoiler)]

  10. Alex Alex says:

    I am sad that I had to give 2 stars to an Agatha Christie book because I am a huge fan. I took this book with a lot of hope. This book is so famous I thought I will have a fantastic reading experience with it. I felt distraught after reading it.

    The 2 stars are for the following:

    The original idea of the story, a criminal who puts thoughts into people and make them commit crimes. It was brilliant. Totally awesome.

    Secondly, the book portrays many kinds of people and their relationships. And I thought Christie was able to bring justice to that.

    Things I hated about this book:

    Characters: Apparently the only character I could like was that of the murderer.( sigh!) All the rest of them were totally unbearable. Couldn't stand anyone including Poirot. I couldn't accept their opinions. I hated Poirot for constantly mocking Hastings who is mind you his closest friend and has come to visit Poirot because he asked for him. Now if I were Hastings, I would have left Poirot to succumb to his ailments, the way he treated me. Its almost close to abuse. This is the book where I truly hated Poirot. Ok enough with this stuff.

    Plot: Oh boy. Even though the story line and relationship between the characters are greatly written, the whole story is really stupid. Like Poirot must be held responsible for atleast one murder and another attempt at murder. He could have prevented that from happening. Instead of that he just sits back in his chair and relaxes, leaving poor clueless Hastings to figure out who the murderer is, from a bunch of obnoxious, dark people.

    Conclusion: Equally terrible. Has any of the readers thought about the fact that if Poirot ( trying to avoid spoilers here, please bear with me) did what he did at the end of the story, at the beginning, everything would have been set right. Instead he waits idly so that Christie has a novel to write about!

    Really! This is probably one of the few Christie novels in which I feel Christie was trying to mock at the intellect of the reader as well as that of Hastings! (Obviously).

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